Folk songs – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 06:07:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mystic-world.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T190213.216-1-160x160.png Folk songs – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ 32 32 New Artist Alert: Ada Marques Writes Tender Folk Songs Meant to Heal https://mystic-world.net/new-artist-alert-ada-marques-writes-tender-folk-songs-meant-to-heal/ Tue, 09 Aug 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/new-artist-alert-ada-marques-writes-tender-folk-songs-meant-to-heal/ Photo by Delila Rio Brands may only have released two singles so far, but the cathartic eloquence of his music is beyond doubt. Her first single “Bell,” a singing folk drummer reinforced with dark horns and his own soft whispers, revealed his need to translate personal conflict into opportunities for collective healing. Ironically, the loneliness […]]]>

Photo by Delila Rio

Brands may only have released two singles so far, but the cathartic eloquence of his music is beyond doubt. Her first single “Bell,” a singing folk drummer reinforced with dark horns and his own soft whispers, revealed his need to translate personal conflict into opportunities for collective healing.

Dia De Los Deftones

Ironically, the loneliness of being an only child pushed Marques into songwriting, influenced as she was at an early age by everyone from Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez and Stevie Nicks. Writing down her thoughts on everyday life and her favorite movies or books eventually led her to writing her own songs – as well as for others. The fixation of her music so far has been to cast a warm light on the fears that once tormented her.

Even the lyric video for her single “Bell” is a soothing experience, shot like a nostalgia-laden home video. Not to mention lush instrumentation that swells right alongside the fiery tenderness that springs from Marques’ lyrics.

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Marques’ second single “Towel” is no less curative in its melodic arrangement. But this time she shows a more self-eviscerating side, a side that takes an intimate look at the ugly hatred we often direct at ourselves. “Honey, can’t you see, they wouldn’t care if you left,” she coos to the sound of acoustic guitars. “If I’m honest, I’m never really honest, with anyone but myself.”

The two bachelors are at the heart of the effects an isolated childhood had on Marques. But they also help normalize the troubles each of us face emotionally and mentally every day, especially in terms of having honest and meaningful conversations about them.

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[Visual history of Korea] Arirang folk songs, original improvised rap music of the Korean people https://mystic-world.net/visual-history-of-korea-arirang-folk-songs-original-improvised-rap-music-of-the-korean-people/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 07:01:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/visual-history-of-korea-arirang-folk-songs-original-improvised-rap-music-of-the-korean-people/ A life-size male mannequin representing King Joseon Danjong (1441-1457) is seen against a courtyard in his Cheongnyeompo exile house in Yeongwol, Gangwon Province. Photo © Hyungwon Kang Arirang’s songs evoke powerful emotions and often lead to spontaneous shoulder-dancing movements among Koreans at home or abroad. Arirang is a genre of Korean music with heartbreaking lamentations […]]]>

A life-size male mannequin representing King Joseon Danjong (1441-1457) is seen against a courtyard in his Cheongnyeompo exile house in Yeongwol, Gangwon Province. Photo © Hyungwon Kang

Arirang’s songs evoke powerful emotions and often lead to spontaneous shoulder-dancing movements among Koreans at home or abroad.

Arirang is a genre of Korean music with heartbreaking lamentations over tragedy, hardship, suffering, and injustice. Arirang’s improvisational nature makes it easy for anyone to weave their own poignant life stories into song, like modern-day rap.

Life has always been difficult for ordinary Koreans, especially in remote areas. Poverty, hard work and abrupt political changes have combined to produce what Koreans call “aehwan”, which means sadness and joy. In the DNA of Korean folk music, Arirang is known for expressing these laments in songs.

The Arirang Pass had an ever-present influence on this folk music tradition, giving it its name. Korea is a land dominated by towering mountain ranges, some impassable, isolating the villages and towns of the provinces from each other. “Arirang gogae” means Arirang mountain pass. All Arirang songs feature Arirang’s gogae.

Climbing a difficult mountain pass symbolizes painful life transitions. For example, consider the 1392 story of Hamheung’s fearsome militia leader Yi Seong-gye. He led his private army on a long journey to Gaegyeong, the former capital of Goryeo, and overthrew the rulers there in a bloody mutiny.

Surviving Goryeo officials were forced through one of the 26 gates of the Gaegyeong city walls – which connected all roads to the declining empire – never to look back. Several loyal former Goryeo government officials have crossed mountain passes to Jeongseon county in Gangwon province. There they sang Arirang, lamenting the fate of those who refused to serve two kings.

Cheongnyeompo, where King Danjong (1441-1457) of the Joseon era was sent into exile, is surrounded by Donggang on three sides and a cliff on one side.  Photo © Hyungwon Kang

Cheongnyeompo, where King Danjong (1441-1457) of the Joseon era was sent into exile, is surrounded by Donggang on three sides and a cliff on one side. Photo © Hyungwon Kang

Researchers have identified thousands of Arirang song variations. One of the best-known variants of Arirang comes from Gangwon Province. It commemorates King Danjong (1441-1457) of the Joseon era, whose short reign and tragic life ended when his uncle exiled him to Yeongwol, Gangwon Province.

Jeongseon Arirang “must be sung with the guts; only then do the sounds of the sorrows of a quiet life come out of the bones and the earth,” said Kim Nam-ki, 85, a Jeongseon Arirang master who performed Jeongseon Arirang at the ceremony. opening of the Olympic Winter Games PyeongChang 2018.

“Despite taking ginseng and deer antler tonic daily to prevent aging, what the hell is that rough gray hair on my head! Ah ah!” sing Kim.

Jeongseon has many Arirang songs about the dangerous old ways of harvesting and transporting Korean pine wood to market. This precious wood was used to build royal palaces and houses. It came from the Taebaek Mountains in Gangwon Province, where ancient groves grew abundantly on the high ridges.

Seoul’s insatiable demand for lumber lured people with the rare opportunity of lucrative work.

In times of high water on Donggang, the men of the Jeongseon countryside would jump on wooden rafts and transport pine logs from the Taebaek Mountains downstream to Seoul. A song by Arirang recounts the tragic death of a young man who never returned from a log raft trip and his girlfriend who yearned for his return. She jumped into the river to drown and join her boyfriend in the afterlife.

This song was commemorated by the statues of a young man and a young girl, standing on opposite sides along the banks of Donggang, next to the Jeongseon Arirang training center. This place was the traditional starting point for wooden rafts leaving for Seoul.

Jeongseon Arirang teacher Lee Hyun-soo teaches Arirang at the Jeongseon Arirang training center in Gangwon Province.  Photo © Hyungwon Kang

Jeongseon Arirang teacher Lee Hyun-soo teaches Arirang at the Jeongseon Arirang training center in Gangwon Province. Photo © Hyungwon Kang

The song is performed at Arirang Center in Jeongseon County approximately every five days. The performances coincide with the days when the Jeongseon Open Market meets.

Arirang’s music and songs can trigger powerful visceral and emotional reactions in people.

Foreign visitors to Korea in the 19th century, such as Homer Bezaleel Hulbert (1863-1949), noted that “Singing Arirang is like rice for Koreans. Koreans sing because they like to sing.

Hulbert, who was an American missionary, journalist, and political activist, advocated for Korean independence from Japanese colonial rule. Hulbert was a close personal friend and adviser to Emperor Gojong, and taught English to Syngman Rhee, the future first president of the Republic of Korea.

Arirang’s songs have spread far beyond the Korean homeland. Overseas Koreans who have suffered tragedy have taken the tradition with them. Arirang music was even found among prisoners of war in Germany – two Korean men who were captured fighting under the Soviet flag were Koreans singing Arirang.

Koreans in the Soviet Union who suffered greatly during the mass relocation of Joseph Stalin in 1937 still sing Arirang songs.

Hundreds of thousands of Soviet Koreans from the Russian Far East were forcibly moved to the uninhabited plains of Central Asia, present-day Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan. Tens of thousands of people did not survive the unheated train journey covering some 6,400km from home and the ensuing winter when people had to dig holes in the ground to survive the elements.

A 1951 scarf shows the partition of Arirang with the flag of the United Nations Forces fighting in the Korean War.  Some foreign musicians recorded Arirang's tune when they returned from Korea.  Photo © Hyungwon Kang

A 1951 scarf shows the partition of Arirang with the flag of the United Nations Forces fighting in the Korean War. Some foreign musicians recorded Arirang’s tune when they returned from Korea. Photo © Hyungwon Kang

Arirang also became part of the Korean experience for United Nations soldiers fighting in the Korean War.

A vintage 1951 Arirang scarf made during the Korean War has a Korean Arirang song on sheet music with the following romanization of Arirang’s lyrics:

A RI RANG A RIRANG A RA RI YO – –

A RI RIANG KOGERO NEO-MO KANDA

NA – LUL BEO LEEGO KA SI-NAN NIM – ONE

SIM NI TO MOKKA-SEO BALL BEONG NAN DA.

By Hyungwon Kang (hyungwonkang@gmail.com)

Korean American photojournalist and columnist Hyungwon Kang is currently documenting Korean history and culture in pictures and words for future generations. — Ed.

By Korea Herald (khnews@heraldcorp.com)

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Using traditional folk songs to fight fear of vaccines in tribal communities in Rajasthan https://mystic-world.net/using-traditional-folk-songs-to-fight-fear-of-vaccines-in-tribal-communities-in-rajasthan/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 20:34:14 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/using-traditional-folk-songs-to-fight-fear-of-vaccines-in-tribal-communities-in-rajasthan/ SIROHI, India – The sequins of the Rajasthani yellow and green dress of Navli Garasiya, 30, glisten in the sun as she dances to a traditional tribal song adapted against the backdrop of the scenic Aravali Hills in Mount Abu, western Indian state of Rajasthan. The song is about the benefits of vaccines. Navli belongs […]]]>

SIROHI, India – The sequins of the Rajasthani yellow and green dress of Navli Garasiya, 30, glisten in the sun as she dances to a traditional tribal song adapted against the backdrop of the scenic Aravali Hills in Mount Abu, western Indian state of Rajasthan. The song is about the benefits of vaccines. Navli belongs to the Garasiya tribe, residing mainly in the Sirohi district of Rajasthan.

As the world observes World Immunization Week from April 24-30, it’s Thanksgiving, a time for health workers and frontline workers like Navli. They play a crucial role in countering deep-seated misinformation and rejection of vaccines within remote tribal communities. Body piercing (with the exception of tattoos) is traditionally taboo in this community.

The entrenched resistance to needles was a challenge for frontline workers as the community refused to vaccinate children for routine government-run immunization programs. The population showed the same resistance when the COVID-19 pandemic hit, and vaccination of vulnerable adult populations was rolled out in early 2021.

To remedy the situation, UNICEF supported civil society Jan Chetna Sansthan, who was enlisted. Navli was hired as a public health volunteer to work with Sharmi Bai, Block Development.

The commissioner also served as the chairman of the Panchayat (village council) of Nichalagarh in Sirohi district. Sharmi, a proud leader of the Garasiya tribe, has inspired other women to take the lead and catalyze healthier practices for the community.

Joining Navli and Sharmi is 106-year-old Huji Bai, who has become an icon for the community. Coaxed by Navli and Sharmi, Huji Bai received her very first vaccine only a year ago, as taboos and social norms had prevented her from getting vaccinated for years.

Huji Bai’s wrinkled face cracks into a smile. “I led by example. Vaccines protect lives,” she says, looking fondly at her grandchildren playing nearby. Her age and belief in the vaccine encouraged others in the community to take their doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. The fact that she was safe and healthy, even after taking the vaccine, helped to demolish fears and change mindsets.

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Chamba ‘rumals’, folk songs mark the return of Minjar Mela https://mystic-world.net/chamba-rumals-folk-songs-mark-the-return-of-minjar-mela/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 21:19:34 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/chamba-rumals-folk-songs-mark-the-return-of-minjar-mela/ The heritage and folk traditions of Himachal Pradesh have played an important role in the progress and development of the state, Governor Rajendra Vishwanath Arlekar said on Sunday. He was speaking on the opening day of the International Minjar Mela de Chamba. The historic fair has made a comeback after a two-year Covid-induced hiatus. Chamba […]]]>

The heritage and folk traditions of Himachal Pradesh have played an important role in the progress and development of the state, Governor Rajendra Vishwanath Arlekar said on Sunday. He was speaking on the opening day of the International Minjar Mela de Chamba.

The historic fair has made a comeback after a two-year Covid-induced hiatus. Chamba Municipal Council Chairman Neelam Nayyar presented the governor with a minjar, a silk tassel unique to the region. The governor also received a Chamba rumal, another distinctive handicraft.

Speaking on the occasion, Arlekar said the fair has its own identity. He praised the efforts made to promote art and culture and maintain social harmony, before stressing the appropriate inclusion of modernity in the successful organization of the fair.

Arlekar pointed to the rich folk tradition of Chamba, saying the people of the region have done well to protect it. He further said that the state has managed to keep its tradition alive despite the many modern influences, crediting the various fairs and festivals held across the state with contributing to the same.

Arlekar also praised the region’s handicrafts, especially the famous rumal and chappal Chamba, saying they have brought international recognition to the region.

Earlier, the governor officially inaugurated the Minjar fair by hoisting the Indian national flag, accompanied by traditional Kunjadi Malhar songs. He also opened the exhibition set up by various state government departments, councils and corporations.

Minjar Mela sports competitions were also declared open in the presence of Police Commissioner Abhishek Yadav.

The deputy commissioner of Chamba and chairman of the fair committee said that the interest of every section of the public was taken into consideration while organizing the cultural event, adding that the artists of Chamba and other districts of the state would perform different acts over the three days. fair.

Himachal Pradesh Vice President Vidhan Sabha Hansraj and Chamba Member of Legislature Pawan Nayyar were also present on the opening day of the fair.

The story

The Minjar Mela de Chamba is believed to have started in the 10th century to mark the triumph of King Sahila Varman over the King of Kangra. It has also become the symbol of corn flowering and is associated with the monsoon, where farmers pray for generous rain in the hope of a good harvest.

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Concert of Greek folk songs on Friday at the Hellenic Museum https://mystic-world.net/concert-of-greek-folk-songs-on-friday-at-the-hellenic-museum/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 15:11:15 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/concert-of-greek-folk-songs-on-friday-at-the-hellenic-museum/ On Friday, July 22, beginning at 5:30 p.m., the Hellenic Museum of Michigan presents a concert of Greek folk songs transcribed for string quartet especially for the Concert of Colors. The performance will be conducted by Kypros Markou, who also created the transcriptions. Markou, violinist, professor and director of orchestral studies at Wayne State University, […]]]>

On Friday, July 22, beginning at 5:30 p.m., the Hellenic Museum of Michigan presents a concert of Greek folk songs transcribed for string quartet especially for the Concert of Colors. The performance will be conducted by Kypros Markou, who also created the transcriptions.

Markou, violinist, professor and director of orchestral studies at Wayne State University, has been active as a conductor, orchestra player and chamber musician around the world. Teaching also played an important role in his activities, including violin, conducting, theory and chamber music. He has a wide and diverse repertoire and also enjoys exploring Greek folk music.

The members of the string quartet are:

Debra Terry, violin, is currently Principal Violin of the Dearborn Symphony Orchestra, as well as Principal Violinist of the Flint and Saginaw Symphony Orchestras. She also occasionally gives solo performances and chamber concerts with various groups and is a member of the Duquesa Trio. She also teaches violin and viola according to the Suzuki method in her own private studio in Canton.

Joseph Deller, viola, hails from Dearborn and is currently a member of the Detroit Opera Orchestra, as well as the Flint Symphony Orchestra. He is also the conductor of the Dearborn Youth Symphony and maintains a studio of violin, viola and piano students in Dearborn.

Mauricio Betanzo, cello, was born in Chile. He has performed internationally in North and South America. In the United States, he received scholarships and obtained a performance certificate from Carnegie Mellon University and a master’s degree from the Catholic University of America. He spent time in Washington, DC, and became a regular member of the Maryland Symphony Orchestra. He now resides in Metro Detroit and has expanded his passion through Betanzo Cello Studio, offering private lessons to young, developing artists. Additionally, he performs with a variety of orchestras, ensembles and chamber groups.

The Aegean Roots are also performing well. This group has performed at the museum since its opening and presents the Sidoori, the bouzouki and the violin. Tom Christy is a director.

Performances are free.

The Hellenic Museum is located at 67 E. Kirby in the heart of the Cultural Center across from the DIA. For more information, call (313) 871-4100.

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Capturing elephants and folk songs on camera, Bhopal film festival frames tribal talent https://mystic-world.net/capturing-elephants-and-folk-songs-on-camera-bhopal-film-festival-frames-tribal-talent/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 04:55:10 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/capturing-elephants-and-folk-songs-on-camera-bhopal-film-festival-frames-tribal-talent/ Bhopal: The elephants had arrived in his village of Ranchi after more than a decade. Sahebram Bediya, a 23-year-old man from Jharkhand, picked up the camera and began documenting the havoc they were causing. He was the first to capture human-animal destruction and conflict live. A high school dropout and eldest son of a disabled […]]]>

Bhopal: The elephants had arrived in his village of Ranchi after more than a decade. Sahebram Bediya, a 23-year-old man from Jharkhand, picked up the camera and began documenting the havoc they were causing. He was the first to capture human-animal destruction and conflict live. A high school dropout and eldest son of a disabled father, Bediya was now a movie pro.

And he’s at a film festival in Bhopal celebrated by culture and film czars like Krishnendu Bose, Rita Banerjee and Doel Trivedy. Bediya’s movie Gaj Dhundh Rahe Galiyara was screened at the festival.

“I didn’t even know how to hold a camera, I didn’t know anything about cinema or photography, but I learned everything in the process. Now I want to keep making more films like this about the conflicts between man and nature and do something for my family and my community,” he says.

Bediya is not alone. Seventeen rural youth from tribal communities across the country presented their films at the first Green Hub Central India Festival in Bhopal. From social change, natural habitat to women farmers and the erosion of folk traditions, nothing seems to have escaped their lens.

Sooraj Meena, a 21-year-old from Udaipur in Rajasthan who also presented her film at the festival, has not told her family what she has been doing for a year. “I was never able to make them understand the existence of the camera. If they had known I was learning to make movies and work with cameras, they wouldn’t have let me out of the house anymore, so I never told them,” she says. But despite these challenges, she decided to document the lives of young women in her village who were victims of domestic violence and forced marriages.

Green Hub scholarship program students. | Unnati Sharma The Print

Read also : Not a rubber stamp – In Draupadi Murmu’s backyard, the thirst for development has just skyrocketed


Break down the barriers

There are many such stories – of tribal and rural youths who showcased their work at the Bhopal festival this weekend. The group of 17 people, including four women, have just completed an intensive 10-month course – the first edition of the Green Hub Fellowship program – which trained them in multiple aspects of filmmaking. The program aimed to empower them and involve them in issues affecting their communities. The event was organized by civil society groups working in conservation such as Dusty Foot Foundation and Mahashakti Seva Kendra, in association with the Bharat Rural Livelihood Foundation, an initiative of the Ministry of Rural Development aimed at scaling up the civil society action.

The two-day event in Bhopal was the premier exhibition of tribal youth in the world of film festivals. And for many, even the simple act of speaking on stage and answering audience questions about their films. The audience included Madhya Pradesh civil society figures, non-governmental organizations, filmmakers, academics, journalists and students like themselves. In a crowded auditorium, they were asked questions about the challenges they faced when making films. Fellow and tribal girl from Chhattisgarh, Arti Singh told the audience how she was prevented from filming by upper caste communities in a village in Ajmer in Rajasthan. Singh was trying to document the story of a female farmer – Saguni Devi.

Saguni Devi was also in Bhopal, stepping out of her home country for the first time to see her story on the big screen. She then took the stage and sang a song she wrote about the plight of a young girl from Rajasthan who is not allowed to go to school unlike her brother. The auditorium resounded with stormy applause.

The air at Bhopal’s Ravindra Bhawan was inspiring, filled with so many stories of courage, conviction and passion for community work.


Read also : Why Dhankhar and Murmu are perfect for Modi’s 2024 mission


Conservation, documentation and filmmaking

The 17 scholarship recipients come from four states of Rajasthan, Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and Jharkhand and range in age from 18 to 35, representing the tribal communities of Gond, Baiga, Mahaar, Meena, Kamar among others.

For them, the process of learning about film and documenting human-animal conflict, deforestation, water crisis, gender issues and tribal ceremonies, among others, has helped them better understand their own tribal community and others.

“When I went to East Singhbhum in Jharkhand to make a film for this project, I found many songs that the community sings while trying to save the jungle. I didn’t know this earlier. It inspired me to work for cultural documentation,” says Rohit Sarware from Harda district in Madhya Pradesh, one of the Bhopal festival scholarship recipients.

Another comrade, Vijay Ram Teke from Madhya Pradesh, who opened the festival with a song Chhattisgarhi – an ode to “Dharti Maiyya” (mother earth) – says it is important to digitize and document these songs and cultural practices .

“A mixture of tradition and modernity can save such songs. Every song, sound of tribal instruments, should be digitized and archived,” he says. However, current tribal generations, especially those who have left their ancestral villages, rarely know the songs of their ancestors. Mahima Marwai, a Gond tribe girl from MP’s Mandala district, says she was never inspired to learn these songs and customs, but after spending almost a year documenting tribal traditions and issues , she will now go back and ask her elders to teach her a few. Songs.

Shashi Kumar and Sanjeev Marskole, from Jharkhand and Madhya Pradesh respectively, are inspired to undertake work involving nature conservation and agriculture.

“The idea was that communities should be involved in making films that affect them – about their lives, their cultures, their livelihoods and their environment,” explains Pramathesh Ambasta, CEO of the Bharat Rural Livelihoods Foundation.

“When we talk about tribal societies, tribal communities and geographies, we find that the people talking about them are not necessarily tribal themselves. This could be a way to support and encourage young adivasi to make films that concern them. We must remember that much of this knowledge that exists in tribal societies is now under threat. Even tribal youths may not be so inclined to look at them with a sense of pride or belonging. This whole program and the filmmaking platform was about creating a sense of belonging among these young adivasis,” he told ThePrint.

Rita Banerjee, award-winning conservation filmmaker and co-founder of Green Hub India, says video is a transformative tool for social change. “I’m a filmmaker myself and have found the process of making videos to be a great way to learn about conservation and social change. It’s a very experiential type of learning.”

Prof. GN Devy, Chairman of the BRLF and Chief Guest of the event, enjoyed the films made by the fellows and emphasized the representation of the community by the Adivasis themselves. The world needs to hear the stories of Adivasis from their own perspective, he said.

Fellows also received a certificate of completion and 23 new fellows were also inducted for the second batch of the project.

Green Hub India is working on the idea of ​​engaging and empowering youth in rural areas and tribal communities through visual media, and in turn creating a bank of digital resources for wildlife, environment and indigenous knowledge. The Green Hub Fellowship involves learning the technical aspects of filming, editing, and storytelling; bringing to life untold stories about the land, people and generational knowledge. The Fellowship was first launched in the North East and engaged young people from across the region, with the aim of documenting and conserving wildlife, biodiversity and sustainable traditional practices.

The community has moved to central India, home to 76 million tribal people. The first edition of the program invited applications from four states in the central Indian region with a significant tribal population – Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Jharkhand. During the 10-month program, participants were trained in video documentation and filmmaking by prominent resource persons from across the country. They were then matched with a key social organization in the area for an internship, through which they documented one of the key issues concerning the communities.

“We’ve been in the northeast for six years, and 90% of the fellows are now working on conservation or social change, either using the camera or working with communities. And that gave us a base to take the fellowship to other places. Central India is geographically and culturally different from the northeast, but the potential is the same,” says Banerji.


Read also : Rajya Sabha was India’s ‘elite space’. Modi raped him with Dalit artist Ilaiyaraaja


Sense of belonging, pride

Many of the fellows who joined the program were associated with civil society organizations working in their respective fields. Although not all of them have had relationships, they see this as an opportunity to create a chain of change by moving forward those who have been left behind.

Annu Bagmare, a 26-year-old Gond girl who has made films documenting the work of an NGO working in the field of children’s education, says she heard about the scholarship through the NGO with whom she works. However, she feels that now she and others like her, who have had an opportunity, have a responsibility to move forward those who are still being left behind.

“Whether there is an NGO or not, there will be a clan of those with power, who will move their communities forward.” She also raised awareness and helped girls in her community to apply for the next batch of scholarships.

These young tribals want to move forward, but at the same time, also feel a sense of belonging to their roots. Devesh Singh, Sanjeev Marshkol and Shashi Kumar – three fellows from different communities – understand the importance of moving forward with the world, but also realize how crucial it is for Adivasi communities not to forget their own culture.

“If you want to progress, you have to leave your village. Education is crucial, but I think there should be a way to balance both development and conservation,” says Devesh.

Mahima Marwai, however, has a complaint. She went to see the Tribal Museum in Bhopal, and said there was not enough representation. “It’s good to make a museum about tribal communities, but I think there should have been more things to display. It does not cover the entire tribal community. Also, if one really wants to experience the tribal culture, one should visit the villages rather than the museums. Our culture is not represented enough in museums,” she says.

(Edited by Anurag Chaubey)

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Guitar Tales: How Niwel Tsumbu Reinvents Congolese Folk Songs With His Polyphonic Guitar Fusion | Guitare.com https://mystic-world.net/guitar-tales-how-niwel-tsumbu-reinvents-congolese-folk-songs-with-his-polyphonic-guitar-fusion-guitare-com/ Mon, 18 Jul 2022 08:00:29 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/guitar-tales-how-niwel-tsumbu-reinvents-congolese-folk-songs-with-his-polyphonic-guitar-fusion-guitare-com/ Based in Ireland, Niwel Tsumbu wields an exhilarating guitar style that draws from jazz, classical, rock, folk and rumba. Sometimes Tsumbu’s music is a well of deep emotions, drawing joy and sadness from universal human waters. To others, it’s a high-tech vehicle that sparkles enthusiastically across nations, continents and the cosmos. Growing up in Kinshasa, […]]]>

Based in Ireland, Niwel Tsumbu wields an exhilarating guitar style that draws from jazz, classical, rock, folk and rumba. Sometimes Tsumbu’s music is a well of deep emotions, drawing joy and sadness from universal human waters. To others, it’s a high-tech vehicle that sparkles enthusiastically across nations, continents and the cosmos.

Growing up in Kinshasa, Tsumbu was first exposed to traditional Congolese music in church. At the same time, he was absorbing Western classical composers such as Beethoven and Vivaldi on the radio. At the age of 16, he took up the guitar and quickly discovered that he had a prodigious ability to play the traditional styles of soukous and rumba. At 17, his teacher Crispin Ngoy introduced him to jazz.

“I don’t think about styles when I play or listen to music,” Tsumbu says. “All music is just sound. It’s like water for me: the same that falls from the sky becomes the sea, the river that we drink, where we shower, etc. Everything I heard, from traditional Congolese music to classical, jazz, rock, pop, metal, influenced me. I love everything, and it’s all part of my culture as a citizen of the universe.

Against his family’s wishes, in 1997, Tsumbu secretly enrolled in a music school but he didn’t like it and only stayed there for a year. His passion made him walk for hours every day just to listen to music. But at the time, he didn’t own a guitar.

Image: Press

In 2004 Tsumbu moved to Ireland and founded his band in 2007. This 10 piece band started touring the country performing his Big Bang Symphony, and he began an important long-term collaboration with percussionist Eamonn Cagney. The pair released The art of the duo this year a record featuring a number of African musical traditions combined with classical guitar harmonies with a dash of Congolese and East African in the mix too.

“I like it because it’s a nylon-string guitar but not a classical or flamenco guitar,” he says of his approach to the instrument. “A lot of people think I play classical or flamenco, but the reality is that I don’t. I play nylon string guitar because I like its sound with normal tension on some D’Addario strings.

As for specific instruments, Tsumbu has a deep love for his Taylor NS32-CE, the oldest of a few guitars he uses, although it is starting to be supplanted by newer instruments.

“I’ve had a deep love for the nylon-string guitar ever since I heard the great Brazilian guitarist Baden Powell on a tape I owned many years ago,” he explains. “Although on this recording I’m using a Spanish guitar, it’s my very last guitar. I’m still not very used to it, but it served very well for recording.

Niwel Tsumbu
Image: Press

re-imagining

Tsumbu recently started using Instagram to post music content, including guitar tips, and her posts have been met with rave reviews. “It’s growing very fast,” he says. “I get thousands of followers every week. It’s amazing.”

“It turns out the lockdown has been very creative for me on social media as well. Not playing gigs has given me time and space to think more about social media, which I didn’t use much before. I started being active on Instagram and now many of my followers are learning tips I share and sending me clips of them performing. I love seeing them. It’s incredibly rewarding. Some of them contact for private lessons on Zoom! »

Now fresh off performing on Rhiannon Giddens and Francesco Turrisi’s Grammy-winning album They call me home, Tsumbu is set to release a series of new arrangements based on traditional Congolese songs, which he started working on during the pandemic to help keep his mind sharp. The first of them, Kanzenzenzewas released on July 4.

“It’s something I always wanted to do but didn’t have time to do until the whole world came to a standstill in 2020,” he says. “The first, Kanzenzenze, is a very simple children’s melody, usually sung a capella or with a drum. At its core, it is a simple melody singing Africa. I applied a light modern harmony that I have learned in my music making experience so far.

Niwel Tsumbu
Image: Press

The keystones of Tsumbu’s new arrangements of African folk songs are his sense of rhythm, his virtuoso playing and his thrilling improvisations, which he was able to apply to song due to his unrecognized nature. “No one really knows the origin of Kanzenzenze, he says. “The version I sing is in Tshiluba, one of the many Congolese languages. It is believed to be an ancient song about 10 fingers and 10 toes.

Kanzenzenze evokes the days of youth spent playing with friends and explores how childhood memories can comfort us throughout our adult lives. “It’s a song we used to sing when we were kids while playing a game. You’re sitting close together in a line, pointing your feet, singing, while counting your feet with your fingers. Whatever either the person on whom the last note ends, it is eliminated.

Tsumbu’s version of the song is stripped down, putting vocals and melody front and center. Accompanying its lilting melody is Tsumbu’s intricate nylon-string guitar, which subtly projects the song into shifting harmonic lights. “I could have added a lot of other instruments but I refrained,” says Tsumbu. “Because of the lockdown, I’ve spent most of the last two years playing and singing by myself, so I thought that should reflect in the music.”
Whether playing rumba or jazz, plucked nylon or amplified electric, Tsumbu’s intricate guitar work always invites repeat listening.

For more, follow Niwel Tsumbu on Spotify.

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Michelle O’Rourke and Ficino Ensemble: folksongs https://mystic-world.net/michelle-orourke-and-ficino-ensemble-folksongs/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 05:04:28 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/michelle-orourke-and-ficino-ensemble-folksongs/ Folk songs Artist: Michelle O’Rourke and the Ficin Ensemble Gender: Classical/folk Label: Ergodos Luciano Berio composed his 1964 folksongs to celebrate the very special voice of Cathy Berberian (1925-1983), muse of many avant-garde composers of the 1950s and 1960s. Berberian was a vocal chameleon with a range of over three octaves , enough, as someone […]]]>

Folk songs

Artist: Michelle O’Rourke and the Ficin Ensemble

Gender: Classical/folk

Label: Ergodos

Luciano Berio composed his 1964 folksongs to celebrate the very special voice of Cathy Berberian (1925-1983), muse of many avant-garde composers of the 1950s and 1960s. Berberian was a vocal chameleon with a range of over three octaves , enough, as someone has already noted, for her to sing both Tristan and Isolde.

This new CD from Ergodos is a celebration of another remarkable voice, that of Irish singer Michelle O’Rourke who, like Berberian, does not hesitate to adopt a much more natural and unformed style of sound production than the most singers trained at the conservatory, while remaining equally sophisticated in terms of interpretation. So she’s kind of a natural for the amorous vocal showcase Berio wrote when he was still married to Berberian. The appeal of the Ensemble Ficino performance is limited by a recording that is more lit than mixed.

Couplings are four rather serious new engagements with folksong – Judd Greenstein’s The Green Fields of Amerikay, most thoroughly grounded in folksong roots; Kevin O’Connell’s Late-crying voice, freest and most dissonant; Kate Moore’s Cronachdain Suil, the most immediately seductive; and I’ll Be Where I Am Not by Garrett Sholdice, the most spared and also closest to the Berber/berio connection, as Sholdice and O’Rourke are also husband and wife.

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Review: Willi Carlisle sings satirical and populist folk songs https://mystic-world.net/review-willi-carlisle-sings-satirical-and-populist-folk-songs/ Thu, 14 Jul 2022 20:59:13 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/review-willi-carlisle-sings-satirical-and-populist-folk-songs/ Willi Carlisle’s new album, titled ‘Peculiar, Missouri’, is a collection of campfire folk songs that celebrate love while railing against capitalism, meritocracy, our political divide and the designated hitter. “Particular, Missouri”, Willi Carlisle (Free Dirt Records) From a 6-foot-4, 300-pound gay former high school captain who went on to sing Midwestern punk rock, pursue poetry […]]]>

Willi Carlisle’s new album, titled ‘Peculiar, Missouri’, is a collection of campfire folk songs that celebrate love while railing against capitalism, meritocracy, our political divide and the designated hitter.

“Particular, Missouri”, Willi Carlisle (Free Dirt Records)

From a 6-foot-4, 300-pound gay former high school captain who went on to sing Midwestern punk rock, pursue poetry in New York City, then earn a scholarship to teach literature in the Ozarks, this album is what what you’d expect: different.

It’s great too.

Like the prairie pioneers who inform his muse, Willi Carlisle traveled remarkable ground to arrive at “Peculiar, Missouri,” a collection of campfire folks who celebrate love while railing against capitalism, meritocracy, our political division and the designated hitter.

Carlisle’s sharp satire and literary bent separate him from the populist pack. He draws inspiration from the work of Carl Sandburg and ee cummings, rhymes “Bugatti” with “Passamaquoddy” and uses words such as fractal and chlorophyllic.

His range of styles also helps put “Peculiar, Missouri” on the musical map. The anthem ‘I Won’t Be Afraid’ will bring goosebumps with a singalong chorus aided by the voice of Ordinary Elephant, before Carlisle pledges to ‘love whoever I want’. The title cut is a talking blues that takes a pivotal turn in the cosmetics aisle at Walmart, while the banjo “Your Heart’s a Big Tent” offers a group hug. “Life on the Fence,” a tearful waltz about a conflicted bisexual, describes a love triangle in 3/4 time, and the traditional drony ballad “Rainbow Mid Life’s Willow” evokes the Scottish Highlands even as Carlisle pronounces “wallow” like “waller”. .”

Elsewhere, Carlisle sings of a family sawn in two (“Tulsa’s Last Magician”) and the empty allure of the vagabond lifestyle (“Vanlife”), always with a twinkle in its tenor. He also plays a mean button accordion. The former captain deserves a high-five for this entertaining and thought-provoking snapshot of America.

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Orally Preserved, Chithara’s Rich Harvest of Folk Songs Become Permanent | News from Noida https://mystic-world.net/orally-preserved-chitharas-rich-harvest-of-folk-songs-become-permanent-news-from-noida/ Sun, 10 Jul 2022 04:32:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/orally-preserved-chitharas-rich-harvest-of-folk-songs-become-permanent-news-from-noida/ Sheoraj Singh Bhati has the rough, swarthy hands of a cop, but on the harmonium they feel like velvet. His small but engaged audience knows every syllable of ‘Saanwariya nandlal ne maya dikhlai’, but it comes alive in the 64-year-old’s voice and distinctive harmonium accompaniment. Sheoraj is assisted by Rajinder Chavdawhose repertoire includes the melancholy […]]]>
Sheoraj Singh Bhati has the rough, swarthy hands of a cop, but on the harmonium they feel like velvet. His small but engaged audience knows every syllable of ‘Saanwariya nandlal ne maya dikhlai’, but it comes alive in the 64-year-old’s voice and distinctive harmonium accompaniment.
Sheoraj is assisted by Rajinder Chavdawhose repertoire includes the melancholy rendition of “Hari sharan mein aa ja, teri ayu beetey ghadi ghadi” (Come under the wings of the lord as you grow old), a composition by 93-year-old Shyami Bhagat, one of nearly 40 creations of the veteran.

The gathering, in a temple dedicated to Baba Mohan Ram at chithara village, is as much a convivial pastime as it is a celebration of an old local tradition of community gathering around music – not curated from playlists or borrowed from movies, but their own – which has been passed down to children by passionate parents or music-loving elders for generations and preserved primarily in the collective memory of the community.
Chithara, home to around 8,000 people in a semi-urban pocket of Greater Noidahad local wealth folk songs, and artists, through its communities – Gujjars, Jatavs, Brahmins, Thakurs, Kolis and Muslims. There is a local song about just about anything, from festivals, weddings and births, seasons and village life to spouses, love, aging, etc., in addition to a rich variety of devotional compositions, mostly about Lord Krishna, the region being close to Mathura.
But while many sang, few wrote. Sheoraj was an exception. He realized that memory would not always be a reliable database and kept a notebook of all the compositions he knew. The urgency has come to watch young people become addicted to music apps on phones. “I learned these songs when I was a 13 or 14 year old boy from my father and parents in the oral tradition. Later I started writing them, realizing that they would fade over time, being given the next generation’s lack of interest in folk songs. They’re busy with their phones and gadgets,” says Sheoraj.
Bhagat was another prescient enough to keep the notes of his compositions. “I have written more than three dozen songs from my vast experience, ranging from agriculture, various seasons and festivities, but mostly devotional nirgun bhajans. These were published in a local book, which sold over 2,000 copies,” Bhagat told TOI, attributing his songwriting to the “good and happy life I lived, plowing my land, eating pure food and breathing fresh air, and living in harmony”.
Bala (64), a housewife who has lived in Chithara for more than 40 years, is a singer rich in prasav geet (songs about childbirth), bhaat and sawan geet (songs about weddings and monsoon), mundan (child’s haircut ceremony), Holi and family life.
While the dialect is local Gujjar with a touch of Haryanvi, the songs also contain words from Hindi and Rajasthani. Example – “Raja ji gadi lambi si liva do, tero biko pahad ka qila” (my dear husband, buy me a big car because you sold a big property). Or this – “Saas meri pyar kariye, laad kariye, mein peehar chhod ke aeyee” (Mother-in-law, love me, take care of me for I left my parent’s house to come here). “Our songs reflect the mood. Folk singing is a way in which we come together on different occasions and exchange notes about various things like family, festivals and traditions. These gatherings and the culture of folk song maintain the linked village communities,” says Bala.
Another singer, Mithilesh (55), who has lived in Chithara for three decades, says singing is not a male bastion – women have actively participated in folk performances on various cultural occasions. Prominent male singers include Sheoraj, Chavda, Shriom Shastri and Sant Ram Bhagat. Among women, Bala, Bhagvati, Shashi, Mithilesh and Rajan are well known. Most of them are farmers. Some, like Sheoraj, have retired from government.
During the singing sessions, groups of singers perform traditional musical accompaniments such as harmonium, dholak, manjira, chimta, and khartal at a specific location and dress in traditional style. In recent years, audio and video recordings have also been made to record these performances, especially after a group of researchers from a private university led by Professor Jyoti Kumar Sharma came across the treasures of the folk song. of Chithara during a project to document its diversity and traditional knowledge. in 2014-15.
Since then, Sharma, assisted by Amit Kumar Tripathi, a PhD research associate at the university, has documented the songs – 430 to date, including 86 by women – both as audio recordings and written notes. “All the lyrics were provided in a book, which we published for future generations,” Sharma said. Many of them were taken from Sheoraj’s notebooks as the predominantly oral tradition worked its way into a more enduring repertoire, through genres like aarati, bhajan, bhet, dhola, geet, kissa and ragini.
Documenting the songs took many years as researchers went from mohalla to mohalla, chronicling their music. “Inhabitants of different mohallas were invited to participate in a workshop and contribute to the documentation of traditional knowledge. A series of formal and informal semi-structured interviews, workshops with participants and focus group discussions with villagers were also been conducted to gather information about the folk traditions of Chithara,” says Sharma, adding that some of the compositions they chronicled are new and have contemporary references.

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