Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 04:08:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mystic-world.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T190213.216-1-160x160.png Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ 32 32 Skipton Concerts Celebrating Female Composers https://mystic-world.net/skipton-concerts-celebrating-female-composers/ Thu, 24 Nov 2022 17:10:28 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/skipton-concerts-celebrating-female-composers/ THE third concert of Skipton Music’s 75th anniversary season celebrating female composers features award-winning Brazilian soprano Gabriella Di Laccio and the Audacium Baroque Ensemble. Gabriella is the founder and curator of the groundbreaking charity ‘Donne – Women in Music’, the organization that does so much to promote the music of female composers in the UK […]]]>

THE third concert of Skipton Music’s 75th anniversary season celebrating female composers features award-winning Brazilian soprano Gabriella Di Laccio and the Audacium Baroque Ensemble.

Gabriella is the founder and curator of the groundbreaking charity ‘Donne – Women in Music’, the organization that does so much to promote the music of female composers in the UK and around the world. She was named one of the 100 most powerful women in the world by the BBC in 2018.

Joining Gabriella will be Layil Barr on viol/recorder, James Akers, lutenist on guitar/theorbo and David Wright on harpsichord. Together, they will perform a program of music by female composers from the 17th century to the present day, including Barbara Strozzi, Francesca Caccini, Elisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre and many others.

A Skipton Music spokesperson said: “We have been delighted with the feedback from our first two gigs. Viewer numbers are growing and our profile has increased nationally with praise for our season of female songwriters coming from musicians and performers across the UK.

“The third concert of our 75th anniversary season takes place with the support of a generous bequest from Dr Philip da Costa. Philip was a regular at Skipton Music concerts and a passionate Baroque music enthusiast. We are delighted to welcome four members of his family who will travel from Sheffield to attend this very special concert with Audacium Baroque Ensemble.

Worry is Tuesday, December 6 at Skipton Town Hall. skiptonmusic.org.uk

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Movie characters attend composers music concert https://mystic-world.net/movie-characters-attend-composers-music-concert/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 20:33:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/movie-characters-attend-composers-music-concert/ CHARACTERS from Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars and others from films that famous composers Hans Zimmer and John Williams have scored, made their way to the Cliffs Pavilion on Sunday. Ray Gubbay, promoters of the superb Music by Hans Zimmer and John Williams concert performed by the London Concert Orchestra, contacted Essex cosplayers to […]]]>

CHARACTERS from Pirates of the Caribbean, Star Wars and others from films that famous composers Hans Zimmer and John Williams have scored, made their way to the Cliffs Pavilion on Sunday.

Ray Gubbay, promoters of the superb Music by Hans Zimmer and John Williams concert performed by the London Concert Orchestra, contacted Essex cosplayers to ask if they would like to attend.

If you’re unfamiliar with Cosplayers, it’s a community of people who like to dress up and take part in events, shake buckets, and raise money for charity.

‘Essex Sparrow’ aka Craig Knight-Bowers from Basildon, who is part of a cosplay group that calls itself the Blackwater Pirates, was one of the participants who took part in a bid to raise money for the charity chosen by the group, Little Havens.

He said: “We call ourselves the Blackwater Pirates and have accompanied the Essex Cosplayers’ Storm Troopers.

“The production company – Ray Gubbay – who put on the event, gave us a big donation of £400, sorted our dressing rooms and asked if we’d like to go.

“Of course we did.

“We never ask people for money, but we will accompany these events with our charity buckets, and stop and pose for photos.

“At the theater we went into the foyer during the day, I guess you could call it a warm up before the show started.

“It was by far the most glamorous and prestigious event we have ever been invited to.

“It was such a privilege to get back on stage and listen to the London Concert Orchestra – an incredible experience.”

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God of War Ragnarök: one of the composers reveals that she was not credited in the game https://mystic-world.net/god-of-war-ragnarok-one-of-the-composers-reveals-that-she-was-not-credited-in-the-game/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:46:47 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/god-of-war-ragnarok-one-of-the-composers-reveals-that-she-was-not-credited-in-the-game/ Not every developer is in the credits every time, a fact that some in the industry, like localization teams, have consistently talked about. In the case of God of War Ragnarök, one of the people who worked on the soundtrack revealed on Twitter that they weren’t credited at all. According to Jessica Mao, she was […]]]>

Not every developer is in the credits every time, a fact that some in the industry, like localization teams, have consistently talked about. In the case of God of War Ragnarök, one of the people who worked on the soundtrack revealed on Twitter that they weren’t credited at all. According to Jessica Mao, she was told that she doesn’t even qualify to be added via a patch, as she has to meet a few conditions.

“Unfortunately, my name is not in the credits, and apparently it cannot be added in a patch update. I was told that to be credited, my contribution to the game had to meet certain ‘minimum criteria’ “, Mao said on Twitter. “Still not sure what those criteria might be…” The composer naturally chose not to hide her disagreement with the situation.

A big disappointment for the artist

“It was incredibly disappointing and disheartening for me to learn, and I would hate for anyone else to go through this. game developers please credit EVERYONE who is involved in the development of a game. only sense.

Jessica Mao worked in editing, arranging and implementing the game’s music, including the opening scene where Freya pursues Kratos and Atreus, as well as Thor’s fight. “The original mix was too fully orchestrated and had to be toned down to make room for growth in later phases,” she explained. It is one of the pieces of which she is most proud, where she got rid of most of the instruments and favored percussion and vocals.

God of War Ragnarök is available on PS4 and PS5. The game was developed by Santa Monica Studio and quickly established itself as a Game of the Year contender, being nominated as such for The Game Awards 2022, where it will take on titles like Elden Ring and Horizon Forbidden West.

spring | Twitter

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DMU composers win prestigious international awards https://mystic-world.net/dmu-composers-win-prestigious-international-awards/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:34:14 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/dmu-composers-win-prestigious-international-awards/ Two famous composers from De Montfort University Leicester (DMU) have won prestigious awards at international music and audiovisual festivals. John Young, professor of composition at MTI², received the first Francis-Dhomont Prize at the 2022 Akousma Festival in Montreal. Professor John Young won a first prize in Montreal While Bret Battey, professor of audiovisual composition at […]]]>

Two famous composers from De Montfort University Leicester (DMU) have won prestigious awards at international music and audiovisual festivals.

John Young, professor of composition at MTI², received the first Francis-Dhomont Prize at the 2022 Akousma Festival in Montreal.

Professor John Young won a first prize in Montreal

While Bret Battey, professor of audiovisual composition at DMU’s Institute for Sonic Creativity (MTI²), saw his latest audiovisual composition Estuaries 4 won the “Best Music (Europe) Award” from the International Computer Music Association.

Professor Battey also received the ‘Best Video’ award for Estuaries 4 at MuVi6, an event in Spain involving artists, musicians, designers and performers from around the world.

BRET BATTEY resized

Professor Bret Battey’s audiovisual composition won two awards

The work of Professor Young—The Singing Outside— was created in the MTI² Diffusion studio. He then spent four days at McGill University in Montreal rehearsing before performing live using a 64-speaker system.

Professor Young said: “Montreal is something of a global center for electronic music, so it’s really exciting to have won this award.

“I guess the compositions are kind of niche, but you’re not deliberately setting out to make niche or obscure or intellectualized music for people to understand.

“It’s just a matter of exposure. If people come to listen, they have to have an experience that means something to them. I want to touch and move people by using original and innovative ideas.

“The whole process of working with something you created and then installing it in a space with 64 speakers was really interesting.

“I worked in a rehearsal room with other composers around me before performing live and that made it interesting. There was a sense of camaraderie and it was a great experience talking to each other and seeing the different ways we work.

“Performing the piece live scared me a bit because there’s a flip side to performing electronic music and that’s if the equipment breaks down and you have to start over. I guess that’s is a bit like a violinist breaking a string, but everything went well and it’s wonderful to have won.

Professor Battey’s work blends music, mathematics and abstract art to create compositions and was judged the best out of 362 works submitted to the International Computer Music Association’s annual conference at the University of Limerick.


Audiovisual composition by Professor Battey Estuaires 4

He said: “Visual music is a technique that is a little over a century old and works on the idea that we can shape the moving image the same way we can shape music.

“The abstract art movement explored the idea that painting could function more like music. They are two very different disciplines but the most familiar ones we know are music and cinema.

“Traditionally, we think of music as an add-on, but in reality, it helps establish how we explore the film. What you see also affects what you hear.

Professor Battey is currently investigating game engines as a means of creating audio-visual art and live musical performance.

You can learn more about MTI² and its work here

Published on: Tuesday, November 22, 2022

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Music by Azerbaijani, Jewish and Turkish composers premiered at Carnegie Hall https://mystic-world.net/music-by-azerbaijani-jewish-and-turkish-composers-premiered-at-carnegie-hall/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 05:40:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/music-by-azerbaijani-jewish-and-turkish-composers-premiered-at-carnegie-hall/ By Orientation The National Music & Global Culture Society, led by founder and concert pianist Nargiz Aliyarova, will perform a concert titled “Bridges of Friendship” at Carnegie Hall in New York on November 22, 2022, Orientation reports. The aim of the concert, where the music of Jewish, Turkish and Azerbaijani composers will be performed, is […]]]>

By Orientation

The National Music & Global Culture Society, led by founder and concert pianist Nargiz Aliyarova, will perform a concert titled “Bridges of Friendship” at Carnegie Hall in New York on November 22, 2022, Orientation reports.

The aim of the concert, where the music of Jewish, Turkish and Azerbaijani composers will be performed, is to unite these three communities and strengthen friendly relations across the world of classical music.

The event dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the birth of the great Azerbaijani composer Fikret Amirov will bring together a couple of world-renowned musicians – violinist Alexander Markov and pianist Nargiz Aliyarova, as well as the New York International Virtuosi Orchestra (NYIVO) conducted by conductor conductor Fuad Ibrahimov.

The event will feature the world premiere of Grammy-nominated “Vox in Terra” by Turkish composer Faruk Kanca, as well as the US premiere of Concerto on Arabic Themes for Piano and Orchestra, co-written by Fikret Amirov and Azerbaijani Jewish composer Elmira. Nazirova. Other works will include the famous violin concertos by Felix Mendelssohn, a Jewish-German composer of the Romantic era, Nevita Kodalli, a renowned Turkish composer, and George Gershwin, a famous Jewish-American composer and New York native.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz

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Eastern View High School student trumpeters and composers excel at state conference https://mystic-world.net/eastern-view-high-school-student-trumpeters-and-composers-excel-at-state-conference/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 20:30:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/eastern-view-high-school-student-trumpeters-and-composers-excel-at-state-conference/ CULPEPER STAR EXHIBITOR The students of the Eastern View High School Orchestra recently enjoyed performing first with top young musicians from all over Virginia and also showcased their jazz compositions at a statewide festival. Trumpeters Ian Larkin and Jonathan Tull, along with student composers Michael Hernandez and Jack Steisslinger, took part in the Virginia Music […]]]>

CULPEPER STAR EXHIBITOR

The students of the Eastern View High School Orchestra recently enjoyed performing first with top young musicians from all over Virginia and also showcased their jazz compositions at a statewide festival.

Trumpeters Ian Larkin and Jonathan Tull, along with student composers Michael Hernandez and Jack Steisslinger, took part in the Virginia Music Educators Conference Nov. 17 in Richmond, EVHS band manager Adam Roach reported in a recent press release.

Larkin performed with the All-Virginia Jazz Ensemble, under the direction of Dr. Longineu Parsons.

Tull was able to play with the All-Virginia Jazz Band, under the direction of Dr. Barry Long.

These bands feature the best high school jazz musicians from across the state, Roach said. The two students got the lead trumpet positions in their respective bands through an audition, the band director added.

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Additionally, musical compositions by Hernandez and Steisslinger have been featured at the VMEA Student Composition Festival.

Led by Dr. Brian Coffill, the Festival highlighted student musical compositions of all styles from across the state, Roach said.

Hernandez’s composition, “Dance of Flames”, was written for a full band.

Steisslinger’s composition, “Anger — The Second Stage of Grief”, was written for piano.

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Composers pay tribute to the late Ned Rorem – SlippediscSlippedisc https://mystic-world.net/composers-pay-tribute-to-the-late-ned-rorem-slippediscslippedisc/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 21:08:28 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/composers-pay-tribute-to-the-late-ned-rorem-slippediscslippedisc/ Norman Lebrecht November 19, 2022 Ned Rorem died friday at the age of 99. We must not believe this if we do not want to. From the Leonard Bernstein Estate: The Leonard Bernstein family and office are saddened by the passing of Pulizer Prize-winning composer and dear friend of Leonard Bernstein, Ned Rorem.Bernstein and Rorem […]]]>

Norman Lebrecht

November 19, 2022

Ned Rorem died friday at the age of 99. We must not believe this if we do not want to.

From the Leonard Bernstein Estate: The Leonard Bernstein family and office are saddened by the passing of Pulizer Prize-winning composer and dear friend of Leonard Bernstein, Ned Rorem.
Bernstein and Rorem were introduced to each other in 1943 by Shirley Gabis Perle. They became lifelong friends, and Bernstein frequently championed Rorem’s orchestral compositions.
“The problem with you and me, Ned, is that we want everyone in the world to like us personally, and of course that’s impossible; you just don’t meet everyone in the world.
-Leonard Bernstein in “Paris Diary” by Ned Rorem (1966)

From Jennifer Higdon: Ned Rorem…what an amazing person, with truly the most incredible adventures and life stories I have ever met! Here is a gentleman who has crossed paths with so many important personalities in the history of art (during his 99 years). The added bonus is that he was also a great teacher. I’m grateful to have the opportunity to hear his stories and study songwriting with him. Thanks Ned!

From David Leisner: “Ned had an infinitely brilliant mind, a dry wit and a shrewd ear. He was shy, flirtatious, serious and playful at the same time, incredibly selfish, but very interested in others, and, to my great fortune, was very supportive of both my acting and my vocal music. He contributed a surprising amount of guitar music.

From Paul Padillo: “Ned Rorem was one of the gods of my childhood. When I first thought of wanting to compose music, I turned to Rorem. I knew very early on that I was born in the wrong era because I wanted to write like Bach, and not like neo-baroque. Rorem introduced me to music that was NOW and of such ineffable beauty and strangeness that I was captivated by it early on. Some of my early compositions not only imitated him, but were – I can admit as an adult – close imitations of his work.
“As a teenager I was obsessed with his diaries and devouring every one of them, sometimes horrified by things a 13 or 14 year old probably shouldn’t know, but I also felt oh, so worldly and bawdy and “adult.” Growing up, I sure wasn’t, and looking back, that was maybe the only time in my life that I thought I really thought I was.
“In college, I worked as an accompanist and kept suggesting Rorem songs to the students I played for. One day in the music library, I heard Phyllis Bryn-Julson sing for the first time. his “Hallelujah,” and I was struck that nothing I would write would be as good as that. It was a hard realization. That’s what happens when you try to imitate a god.

From Professor John Ratledge: “Rest in peace, Ned Rorem. He was an LGBT advocate as he was openly gay at a time when it was illegal in the United States. In his diary, he writes: “I am a composer, not a gay composer… Anyone can be gay, it’s no feat, but I’m the only one who can be me.

UPDATE: A nice review by Russell Platt.

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Ocala Civic Theater to Celebrate Legendary Composers with “Coming Back Like a Song” https://mystic-world.net/ocala-civic-theater-to-celebrate-legendary-composers-with-coming-back-like-a-song/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 23:25:16 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/ocala-civic-theater-to-celebrate-legendary-composers-with-coming-back-like-a-song/ An upcoming play at the Ocala Civic Theater will transport audiences to a Manhattan apartment on Christmas Eve 1956. “Coming Back Like a Song” is based on the real connection between three legendary composers: Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen and Jimmy Van Heusen. In an elegant apartment on Christmas Eve, these songwriters will gather around the […]]]>

An upcoming play at the Ocala Civic Theater will transport audiences to a Manhattan apartment on Christmas Eve 1956.

“Coming Back Like a Song” is based on the real connection between three legendary composers: Irving Berlin, Harold Arlen and Jimmy Van Heusen. In an elegant apartment on Christmas Eve, these songwriters will gather around the piano as they share many martinis, as well as their hopes, dreams and worries about the future of music with rock ‘n’ roll around the corner, according to Ocala Civic Theater.

Performances of “Coming Back Like a Song” will take place on select dates from December 1-18 (Image courtesy of Ocala Civic Theatre)

Performances begin at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 1 at the Ocala Civic Theater, located at 4337 E Silver Springs Boulevard. Additional performances will also take place on the following dates:

  • Friday, December 2 at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday December 3 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday December 4 at 2 p.m.
  • Thursday, December 8 at 7:30 p.m.
  • Friday, December 9 at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday December 10 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday December 11 at 2 p.m.
  • Thursday, December 15 at 7:30 p.m. (Performance in American Sign Language – contact the box office to reserve an ASL area if needed).
  • Friday, December 16 at 7:30 p.m.
  • Saturday December 17 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday December 18 at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $30 for adults (19 and older) and $15 for 18 and under. Ocala Civic Theater states that the show is not suggested for children due to the use of “rather colorful language”.

For more information or to buy tickets, go to Ocala Civic Theater website.

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“It behooves us as songwriters to adapt as much as we can.” https://mystic-world.net/it-behooves-us-as-songwriters-to-adapt-as-much-as-we-can/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 17:44:33 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/it-behooves-us-as-songwriters-to-adapt-as-much-as-we-can/ This week, a Help Musicians survey of more than 500 professional musicians revealed that 98% of them are worried about their ability to earn a living in the next six months. The cost of living crisis is hitting the industry, with many respondents worrying about paying for energy, food, housing and music equipment. Revenues have […]]]>

This week, a Help Musicians survey of more than 500 professional musicians revealed that 98% of them are worried about their ability to earn a living in the next six months. The cost of living crisis is hitting the industry, with many respondents worrying about paying for energy, food, housing and music equipment. Revenues have also been hit by post-Brexit restrictions on touring and composers’ difficulties accessing work overseas. For many smaller, independent practitioners, touring in the EU is no longer financially viable. Add to that the fact that audiences across the country still haven’t returned to their pre-pandemic numbers, and you begin to paint a full picture of the pressure affecting the industry.

As part of this year’s first Composers’ Week, the Ivors Academy is launching Composers under pressure?, a dialogue and campaign exploring the challenges and opportunities facing composers today. Born from a survey of previous winners and nominees of the Ivors Composer Awards, the campaign aims to build an image of the landscape today, as well as looking to the future.

The president of the Ivors Academy Classical Council, Lloyd Coleman, wishes to point out that the Composers under pressure? campaign is the start of a conversation rather than a dirge. But, like many of their peers in the industry, songwriters are feeling the pressure. In addition to issues affecting the music industry as a whole, 44% of survey respondents Composer under pressure? survey reported a decrease in their number of commissions.

“Classical composers work in a model where we often rely on live performances of our music,” says Lloyd. “I think many classical composers will tell you that they make a very small portion of their income from streaming royalties or album sales. Start-up fees are an extremely large part of their income.

In many cases, commissioning fees are what allow composers to continue doing their work. This means that they can afford to take the time to write the two-hour opera or the half-hour concert for an orchestra. Lloyd notes that this was already a difficult pattern without the added stressors, but it becomes an untenable situation. “The cost of living issue has only exacerbated this for many people,” he says. “You certainly see this trend of more people having to take work from other forces, whether it’s teaching, or working in another organization, or working outside of the arts.”

“The less time you spend being able to compose, the less you are on stage and the less able you are to develop your profile as a composer, to get a work performed and listened to.”

Relying on a portfolio career, while effective and fulfilling for some, can also trigger a vicious cycle. “The less time you spend composing, the less you are on stage and the less able you are to develop your profile as a composer, to get a piece performed and heard,” says Lloyd.

Post-Brexit complications have only increased pressure on artists concerned about their profile abroad, with travel restrictions and visa issues making it difficult to collaborate with EU organizations. Closer to home, however, Lloyd says it’s hard to overstate the impact the pandemic is still having on songwriters’ earnings.

“Many audiences have not returned to concert halls and venues, and they are booking much later. Promoters are very nervous about ticket sales and audience attendance post-pandemic, due to the profound shock this has had on our cultural ecosystem,” he says. “That inevitably trickles down to composers and creators in the future. If we can’t sell so many tickets, we can’t do so many concerts, we can’t commission so many composers, and so on.

“We need this new music so that the UK continues to be seen as a global hub of creativity and incredible music makers and musicians.”

The potential ripple effect on the country’s music landscape is striking. “Without this new music, and without new ideas and new inventions, then the art form is static. It just keeps repeating itself,” Lloyd says. “We need this new music if the UK is to continue to be seen as a global hub of creativity and incredible music makers and musicians. It’s a relationship we’ve had for so long. And that’s something that’s much more in jeopardy right now.

Another worrying factor for the future of music in the UK, particularly in England, is the pressure on publicly funded music education in schools. A good investment in classical music begins long before new composers reach the professional level. Lloyd recalls that at the 20th anniversary celebration of the Ivors Composer Awards this week, composer and orchestrator Charlotte Harding spoke “with passion and flair” about her own music lessons at school. Having been hugely influenced by her music teacher at school and taking saxophone lessons through the public system, Charlotte won an Ivors Composer Award, among other accolades.

His experience closely mirrors Lloyd’s, and protecting this system is something he is passionate about. “I had free music lessons, free clarinet lessons at school. There was a school orchestra, there was a local youth orchestra, there was a county youth orchestra. There was a real sense of progression. This ecosystem has become increasingly fragile and is almost in danger of collapsing. In some parts of the country, the layout is patchy at best,” he says.

“Having access to free music lessons, instruments and well-trained teachers who are passionate about teaching music is a birthright, I believe. It should be seen as a much more central facet of our education system.

Local charities and after-school programs do a good job, but there’s something to be said for families who don’t have to seek out this education. If kids come across music in their daily school life, those who weren’t already interested might find something sparking. It’s hard to pursue something you haven’t been exposed to. “Having access to free music lessons, instruments and well-trained teachers who are passionate about teaching music is a birthright, I believe. It should be seen as a much more central facet of our education system,” says Lloyd.

If there are many stress points for composers in 2022, the Composers under pressure? campaign is also optimistic about the future. Innovations in social media and technology, for example, have given composers more control over how they work in terms of genre and publication. These tools can also increase the reach of composers and help a little to counter the current difficulties of traveling and working abroad. On the equipment side, new developments can allow orchestras to work with non-traditional instruments to create new sounds and sound compositions. “There are opportunities there to advance the art form,” Lloyd says.

Elsewhere, crowdfunding and community funding sources have enabled composers to continue creating new works on their own terms. “The opportunity with technology is the kind of democratization of being able to create music that is truly about you and truly about what you want to do,” says Lloyd.

The Composers under pressure? will spark conversations around the very real challenges facing the classical sector and composers at all levels. But this is by no means a negative campaign. There are reasons to be optimistic. “It’s also incumbent on us as songwriters to adapt as much as possible,” says Lloyd. “And with some of the challenges that arise, I think there are also opportunities to adapt.”

All of this, he says, is just the start of a conversation. But he hopes it’s one that will lead to positive things for songwriters in the future. “I am by nature a little optimistic,” he says.

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The 10 Greatest Composers of the 21st Century (To Date) https://mystic-world.net/the-10-greatest-composers-of-the-21st-century-to-date/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 16:11:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/the-10-greatest-composers-of-the-21st-century-to-date/ From the concert hall to the gaming console, the last century has seen the number of platforms for brilliant music grow exponentially. Now, somewhere in the 21st century, we take a look at the composers whose works could have the biggest impact on the next 80 years of classical musical creation. Across film scores, jazz […]]]>

From the concert hall to the gaming console, the last century has seen the number of platforms for brilliant music grow exponentially.

Now, somewhere in the 21st century, we take a look at the composers whose works could have the biggest impact on the next 80 years of classical musical creation.

Across film scores, jazz clubs, concert halls and video game soundtracks, 21st century classical music incorporates styles and influences from all that has come before it, including minimalism, romantic music, choral and religious masses, electronics and much more.

Here are 10 of the most notable composers of the past 22 years and hopefully more to come…

  • Max Richter

    Composer, pianist and producer, Max Richter is one of the best-known classical composers at work in this century, with over a billion streams of his music online and another million albums sold. Educated at the University of Edinburgh and the Royal Academy of Music, Richter then studied in Florence under the great pioneer of the 20th century, Luciano Berio, one of the main proponents of experimental electronic music.

    Berio’s influence can be heard in Richter’s music, especially with his use of looping and phasing techniques, heard in his famous work Recomposed by Max Richter: Vivaldi – The Four Seasons, which premiered in 2012. A decade later, in 2022, Richter released a new version with Chineke! Orchestra and Elena Urioste, who was featured in series 4 of the hit Netflix period drama Bridgerton.

  • Ludovic Einaudi

    Since the release of his first solo piano album, The wavein 1996, Ludovico Einaudi’s name became synonymous with hypnotically minimalist piano music.

    Her simple yet hauntingly beautiful melodies have become the hallmark of her work, which has also included scores and soundtracks for ballet, stage and screen. His music has featured in notable film and television productions in the 21st century, including Doctor Zhivago and nomadlandas well as advertisements for major brands of household products.

    In recent years, Einaudi has turned to environmental activism. In 2016, he performed his Elegy for the Arctic on a floating platform amidst icebergs in Norway, raising awareness of melting ice caps and rising sea levels in conjunction with environmental charity Greenpeace.

    Read more: 10 best works by pianist and composer Ludovico Einaudi

  • Hildur Guðnadottir

    Born into a family of musicians, Icelandic composer, cellist and singer Hildur Guðnadóttir is best known for her award-winning film and television scores. In 2019, his score for the film Joker, starring Joaquin Phoenix and Robert de Niro, won the Golden Globe Award and Oscar for Best Original Score, as well as a BAFTA for Best Original Score. These historic achievements made Guðnadóttir the first woman to win each of the three categories, as well as the first Icelander to win an Oscar.

    The same year, his score for the HBO miniseries Chernobyl won another BAFTA Award, as well as a Grammy Award and a Primetime Emmy Award. His most recent project, TÁR, which stars Cate Blanchett as the tyrannical conductor of a major German orchestra, has already been submitted for Oscar consideration for 2023.

    Read more: TÁR: Who is Lydia Tár, what is the music and how did Cate Blanchett learn to conduct?

  • Eric Whitacre

    Award-winning composer and conductor Eric Whitacre is responsible for some of the most celebrated choral music of the 21st century. Known for his close, crisp and complex harmonies, which form what he calls “the golden brick”, his most famous works include Sleep, Waterspoutand Lux Aurumque.

    Whitacre is also known for his Virtual Choir, which he founded in 2009 – a gathering of video recordings from around the world, all synced up to form a mass choir. Its first iteration included 185 singers, gradually increasing until the most recent Virtual Choir 6.0 in May 2020, which included 17,572 performers, including 16 who performed in sign language.

  • Hans Zimmer

    The composer behind many of the best film scores of the 21st century, from Pirates of the Caribbean and The Lion King at Gladiator and CreationHans Zimmer holds 23 industry awards for his soundtracks, including an Oscar, two Golden Globes, four Grammys and three Classical Brits.

    His work did not stop with film music either. Its majestic theme opens every episode of the Netflix drama The crownand he even composed bespoke ringtones and a new audio identity for Netflix’s iconic “Ta-Dum.”

    Read more: Hans Zimmer’s 10 Best Soundtracks

  • Yoko Shimomura

    Japanese composer and pianist Yoko Shimomura is best known for her emotive and much-loved music for video games. She began piano lessons between the ages of four and five, and soon began practicing in her practice sessions, inventing her own original compositions.

    After graduating from the Osaka College of Music, she decides to send some excerpts of her compositions to video game companies. She was hired by Capcom, where she wrote soundtracks for Street Fighter II among other things, before leaving to join Square Enix.

    In 2002, she wrote the soundtrack for Kingdom Hearts, which she said was the most “special” soundtrack for her. Shimomura also wrote an epic Wagnerian soundtrack for Final Fantasy XVtaking the musical lead from Nobuo Uematsu to previous installments in the franchise.

    Read more: 7 of Video Game Composer Yoko Shimomura’s Best Songs

  • Wynton Marsalis

    Wynton Marsalis is an American trumpet player, composer and teacher, working in both jazz and classical genres. With nine Grammy Awards to his name, he is the only musician to win in the jazz and classical categories in the same year at the awards – a feat he achieved at just 22 years old, in 1983.

    Today, alongside his role as Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York, Marsalis is an active presence on the jazz scene in addition to being a prolific composer. In 1997, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Music for his jazz oratorio, Blood on the fieldsand in recent years has written both a violin concerto and ‘Fiddle Dance Suite’ for star Scottish-Italian violinist, Nicola Benedetti.

    Read more: Trumpet player Wynton Marsalis on music and social upheaval: “Jazz teaches you how to create change”

  • Rachel Portman

    English composer Rachel Portman began writing music as a teenager, focusing specifically on film music at Oxford University, where she began composing for fellow films and theater productions .

    Portman has written over 100 soundtracks, including his score for Emma in 1996, making her the first composer to win the Oscar for Best Musical or Comedy Score. Portman has since scored films including Chocolate, Mona Lisa smileand The Duchessand in 2010 was appointed OBE.

    Read more: “We are drilling slowly! – Rachel Portman, Oscar-winning “Emma” composer

  • James MacMillan

    Composer and conductor Sir James MacMillan is one of the most eminent Scottish classical musicians of the 21st century. His first major appearance on the classical scene dates back to 1990 with the creation of The Confessions of Isobel Gowdie – an emotionally charged and powerful account of a young woman in 17th century Scotland, who was accused and then executed for witchcraft.

    Since then MacMillan has composed a percussion concerto for Dame Evelyn Glennie, a cello concerto for Mstislav Rostropovich, and has also written some of the finest choral music of the past 20 years, including The Strathclyde Motets in 2005, and a new setting of the Stabat Mater in 2015. In 2022, MacMillan also composed “Who Will Separate Us?” for the funeral service of Queen Elizabeth II.

    Read more: Lost Songs of St Kilda: listen to forgotten folk music from an abandoned island

  • Alma Deutscher

    17-year-old composer, pianist and violinist Alma Deutscher is one of the brightest young stars of her generation. She wrote her first piano sonata at the age of five, with a short opera, The Dream Sweeper after only two years later. In 2016, when Deutscher was 11, Zubin Mehta sponsored the European premiere of his first complete opera, Cinderella.

    When Deutscher was 13, she moved to Vienna with her family, describing the Austrian city as her “musical homeland”, having grown up on the music of Mozart, Schubert, Beethoven and Haydn. In 2021, at the age of 16, she was admitted to the degree in orchestral conducting at the prestigious University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna, where her predecessors are Zubin Mehta, Claudio Abbado and Kirill Petrenko.

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