Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 02:08:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mystic-world.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T190213.216-1-160x160.png Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ 32 32 Grammy winner Ted Nash to lead SBCC composers in concert at Museum of Art | Culture & Leisure https://mystic-world.net/grammy-winner-ted-nash-to-lead-sbcc-composers-in-concert-at-museum-of-art-culture-leisure/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 01:04:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/grammy-winner-ted-nash-to-lead-sbcc-composers-in-concert-at-museum-of-art-culture-leisure/ Published on June 30, 2022 | 6:04 p.m. Ted Nash performs with students at the 2021 Summer Jazz Workshop. (Courtesy photo) Grammy Award-winning musician and songwriter Ted Nash will lead a group of musicians from the Santa Barbara City College Summer Jazz Seminar in a free concert of original music, at 3 p.m. on Sunday, […]]]>

Published on June 30, 2022
| 6:04 p.m.

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Ted Nash performs with students at the 2021 Summer Jazz Workshop. (Courtesy photo)

Grammy Award-winning musician and songwriter Ted Nash will lead a group of musicians from the Santa Barbara City College Summer Jazz Seminar in a free concert of original music, at 3 p.m. on Sunday, July 10 on the Terrace front of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art (SBMA), 1130 State St.

The pieces are all inspired by or are musical interpretations of artwork from the museum’s Going Global – Abstract Art at Mid-Century exhibition.

The Ted Nash Concert: The Sound of Art will share the creative achievements of students during a two-week workshop held from June 27 to July 8. During his fourth summer as Artist-in-Residence at SBMA, Nash led the band through a unique songwriting process using artwork as inspirations for new musical compositions.

The SBCC Summer Jazz Seminar is led by returning director Andrew Martinez. “Having a theme as an artwork can make the process of creating music less daunting. It also helps that Ted can communicate complex ideas and concepts to everyone and make them understood. We are very lucky to have him. here with us,” Martinez said.

The workshop started Zoom again with Nash walking students through the compositional process he’s used in the past when drawing inspiration from specific paintings. The next day, the students visited the SBMA galleries to choose an artwork as the subject of their composition. Taking photos and detailed notes, they remained in the museum long after the visit was over.

“It’s wonderful to continue our longstanding collaboration with the incomparable Ted Nash for a fifth year and our second year of partnering with SBCC on The Sound of Art,” said Patsy Hicks, director of education at the museum.

“As always, it’s exciting to see students connect with original artwork – this year with the global language of abstract expressionism in the Going Global exhibition. Most exciting of all are the creative compositions that emerge from this exploration and expression of one art form in another,” she said.

The first week of the workshop continued via Zoom as Nash joined the class virtually, offering feedback and suggestions to students as they composed new music for their jazz ensemble.

The Ted Nash Workshop is supported by the SBCC Music Jazz Program Fund through the Santa Barbara City College Foundation. Funding for the museum comes from a grant from the Robert and Mercedes Eicholz Foundation.

To learn more about SBMA exhibits, events and collections, visit the museum website.

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‘Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope’ will feature music from top video game composers https://mystic-world.net/mario-rabbids-sparks-of-hope-will-feature-music-from-top-video-game-composers/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 09:08:50 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/mario-rabbids-sparks-of-hope-will-feature-music-from-top-video-game-composers/ Yesterday (June 29) Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope received its own personal showcase from Ubisoft, during which story and mechanics, new characters, and talent lending itself to the score were revealed. Out in October, Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope is the sequel to 2017’s Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle. In this occasion, Mario […]]]>

Yesterday (June 29) Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope received its own personal showcase from Ubisoft, during which story and mechanics, new characters, and talent lending itself to the score were revealed.

Out in October, Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope is the sequel to 2017’s Mario + Rabbids Kingdom Battle. In this occasion, Mario and the Rabbids will travel to a new galaxy to save the Sparks – Rabbids versions of Lumas from Super Mario Galaxy. A force named Cursa wants to destroy them and it’s up to Mario and the Rabbids to save them and the universe. Bowser, Rabbid Rosaline, and Edge are all new playable characters joining the fold, with the game seemingly leaving out Yoshi, Donkey Kong, Rabbid Yoshi, and Rabbid Cranky from the original, as yet to be announced.

Perhaps the most notable announcement from the showcase was that of the game’s score composers. Creative director Davide Soliani was the one to reveal the trio, saying, “I’m very happy to confirm the return of my dear friend, the super talented Grant Kirkhope as a composer for Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope.” Soliani continued: “But he won’t be alone this time, as we have assembled an outstanding team of talent from around the world. He will be joined by Gareth Coker and Yoko Shimomura, two phenomenal songwriters who I am more than proud to have on our journey now.

Kirkhope is well known for providing the soundtrack for classic Rare titles including donkey kong, Banjo Kazooie and GoldenEye 007 as well as more recent titles such as World of Warcraftit is Shadowland expanding and Kingdoms of Amalur: Re-Reckoning.

Joining him, Coker created the soundtracks for both Or I games, for which he won an Ivor Novello award for Ori and the Will of the Wisps, Ark: Survival Evolved, Immortals Fenyx Rising and Infinite Halo among many others. Shimomura, on the other hand, composed for games as early as the late 1980s such as street fighter 2, Super Mario RPG, legend of mana, Final Fantasy 15, Brawl Super Smash Bros. and Ultimate as well as most Kingdom Hearts titles released so far. She also lends her talents to the next Legend of Mana: The Teardrop Crystal anime series, slated for release in October 2022.

Mario + Rabbids Sparks of Hope will be released on October 20 on Nintendo Switch.

In other news, ‘Pokémon Go’ creator Niantic has canceled four upcoming projects, cutting staff by 8%.

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Fermilab launches a call for visual artists and composers for the 2023 cycle https://mystic-world.net/fermilab-launches-a-call-for-visual-artists-and-composers-for-the-2023-cycle/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 22:07:38 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/fermilab-launches-a-call-for-visual-artists-and-composers-for-the-2023-cycle/ To stimulate communication and interaction between scientists, artists and the public, Fermilab at Batavia has created an Artists in Residence Program and a Guest Composers Program. They are currently seeking applications for the 2023 cycle. Fermilab is the US national laboratory dedicated to particle physics research. This call is open to visual artists, composers and […]]]>

To stimulate communication and interaction between scientists, artists and the public, Fermilab at Batavia has created an Artists in Residence Program and a Guest Composers Program.

They are currently seeking applications for the 2023 cycle. Fermilab is the US national laboratory dedicated to particle physics research.

This call is open to visual artists, composers and other creators. The artists will interact with the scientists of the laboratory and will discover their research and their links with society.

This information will then be used to create a body of work, leading to presentations in the community and possibly an exhibition/concert of the work created during the Fermilab residency.

A small stipend will be provided by Fermi Research Alliance.

Currently, we are planning virtual introductions and inspiration.

The application period for the Artists in Residence and Guest Composers programs opened on June 1 and closes at midnight on August 31.

Candidates may be contacted for an interview and presentation of examples of their portfolio.

Creators must be motivated and autonomous. Applicants will be notified by October 28, 2022 or earlier.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

Questions for these programs should be submitted to art@fnal.gov.

The application will require: a curriculum vitae/CV; artist/composer statement; letter of intent describing what you hope to accomplish through this residency and how you will contribute to the program as well as the community; a letter of recommendation; images of work in progress or recent saves that represent your work; and links to web pages and other social media are encouraged.

For the application form, visit events.fnal.gov/art-gallery/air-2023callall_final/.

]]> Film event to showcase local composers – Port Arthur News https://mystic-world.net/film-event-to-showcase-local-composers-port-arthur-news/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 05:33:13 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/film-event-to-showcase-local-composers-port-arthur-news/ Boomtown Film Society gives local composers the opportunity to show off their skills to produce a musical score for the film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. The group is holding the event at the Jefferson Theater in Beaumont on July 23. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the box office. Doors open at […]]]>

Boomtown Film Society gives local composers the opportunity to show off their skills to produce a musical score for the film The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari.

The group is holding the event at the Jefferson Theater in Beaumont on July 23.

Tickets are $5 and can be purchased at the box office. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the featured presentation begins at 7 p.m.

One of the film society’s organizers, Christopher Dombrosky from Nederland, said the group wanted to give local composers a chance to perform in front of an audience.

“We hold events throughout the year,” he said. “Typically, events that take place throughout the year that deal with cinema and filmmaking focus on directors, writers and actors. There’s never been anything that focused on people making music for film, even though there were people who wanted to do that.

Dombrosky said the idea came about when the Jefferson Theater approached the film company for programming ideas.

“I sent a list of non-traditional things they could do there,” he said. “One of those ideas was this project that we called internally the Silent Score Showcase. It was an idea that I suggested. Everyone I spoke to about it was very excited.

“Basically, the feedback I had received made me feel like there was so much momentum that we should just make it through, no matter what.”

Dombrosky said the theater liked the idea and invited the film company to present it at a high-profile event.

Caden Welborn, Faith Baha Ömeroglu, Isaiah Grande and RMSstringer will provide the original score for the 1920 classic.

Participants will be able to watch the film and hear the original music. Dombrosky said there would be breaks in the film to say who produced the score for this section and introduce the next composer, all of whom have different styles.

“Each of these composers has a different background,” Dombrosky said. “The first is very traditional. It’s what people think about when they go to see a movie. Then, he is interested in composers whose style is more experimental or ambient. Then the final segment is something you might hear from a DJ. It’s really a variety that people will have when they go to see the movie. Even though there was nothing exciting or particularly different with the score, any showing of The Office of Dr. Caligari is an event for movie buffs.

The film society organizer hopes the event will become a mainstay of the organization.

“It’s long been over the top that they’re getting a little bit of attention,” Dombrosky said. “I hope if this project is successful, it will become an annual series where we ask local producers to rate projects and show what they can do.”

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New festival appeals to emerging composers and musicians https://mystic-world.net/new-festival-appeals-to-emerging-composers-and-musicians/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:19:12 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/new-festival-appeals-to-emerging-composers-and-musicians/ A new music festival, titled ReClassified, is heading to Adelaide’s events calendar this spring. The ReClassified Festival will take place over three Sundays in November 2022. ReClassified is currently calling on emerging composers from South Australia to produce an original composition for the Festival, which will be an avenue to engage professional and emerging artists […]]]>

A new music festival, titled ReClassified, is heading to Adelaide’s events calendar this spring. The ReClassified Festival will take place over three Sundays in November 2022.

ReClassified is currently calling on emerging composers from South Australia to produce an original composition for the Festival, which will be an avenue to engage professional and emerging artists to collaborate and perform these new works.

Recitals Australia Chairman Mark de Raad said: “ReClassified aims to reflect and celebrate the creators of classical music who live and breathe our city. This demonstrates that they are relevant, competent, enthusiastic and knowledgeable about their craft, and eager to share their creations. with the wider community and the world”.

Applications from emerging composers are invited to participate in the project. Apply to Recitals Australia https://recitalsaustralia.org.au/reclassified Applications close Friday, July 22, 2022 at 5:00 p.m. SA time.

ReClassified seeks to provide vital educational opportunities for emerging composers through the Recitals Australia (RA) Emerging Artists Programme. Here, emerging composers will apply for the opportunity to write chamber works and have those pieces worked on in the studio under the guidance of Dr Anne Cawrse and other established local mentor composers. Selected composers will then have their final works performed publicly by experienced musicians and recorded as part of the ReClassified festival. Anne says, “it’s a great way to live and build working relationships with established musicians and songwriters.”

The composers will write works for trios of professional musicians including: Dean Newcomb – clarinet, Mitch Berick – clarinet/bass clarinet, Joshua Oates – oboe, Martin Alexander – viola, Tom Marlin – cello, Josh van Konkelenberg – organ, Cheryl Pickering – mezzo-soprano, Melanie Walters – flute, Helen Ayres – violin.

ReClassified’s mentor composers are: Anne Cawrse, David John Lang, Rachel Bruerville and Martin Cheney.

ReClassified workshops will take place at North Adelaide Baptist Church Hall. November festival performances will take place at North Adelaide Baptist Church and Hall, Stangate House, Aldgate and Z-Ward, Glenside.

ReClassified has received a grant from the Government of South Australia through Arts South Australia, enabling the project to expand its reach and ensure artists and composers are compensated for their valuable time.

Anne Cawrse is an award-winning composer of orchestral, chamber, solo and choral works. His music is described as “seductively beautiful” and “deeply revealing”, and it has been commissioned by many of Australia’s leading orchestras, ensembles and soloists, including the Adelaide and Melbourne Symphony Orchestras, the Australian strings and Adelaide chamber singers. www.annecawrse.com

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Five SA Composers Receive INVISIBILITY Commissions https://mystic-world.net/five-sa-composers-receive-invisibility-commissions/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 23:26:20 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/five-sa-composers-receive-invisibility-commissions/ The names of the five South Australian composers who will receive INVISIBILITY commissions from Chamber Music Adelaide have been announced. They are Luke Altmann, Jesse Budel, Georgina Bowden, Belinda Gehlert and Hilary Kleinig. Luke Altmann, Hilary Kleinig, Georgina Bowden and Belinda Gehlert, four of five composers to receive INVISIBILITY commissions. Photo courtesy of Chamber Music […]]]>

The names of the five South Australian composers who will receive INVISIBILITY commissions from Chamber Music Adelaide have been announced. They are Luke Altmann, Jesse Budel, Georgina Bowden, Belinda Gehlert and Hilary Kleinig.

Luke Altmann, Hilary Kleinig, Georgina Bowden and Belinda Gehlert, four of five composers to receive INVISIBILITY commissions. Photo courtesy of Chamber Music Adelaide

Orders are offered by Chamber Music Adelaide in conjunction with MOD. (Adelaide Discovery Museum), with funding from ArtsSA through the 2022 COVID Recovery Fund.

The composers will each write a new chamber work in response to the MOD’s award-winning 2022 exhibition. INVISIBILITYwhich focuses on revealing the invisible and observing the unseen.

The new works will have their world premiere by South Australian musicians at an event held among the MOD exhibits. at the University of South Australia in October. A second performance will take place as part of the Chamber Music of Adelaide On the Terrace Mini Chamber Music Festival in November.

Applicants were asked to prepare a submission outlining the concept of a work that would express through music ideas of invisibility as depicted in the exhibition, and to tell stories of individual experiences of invisibility. The five composers were chosen by a jury from 18 submissions.

Janet Carey, director of Chamber Music Adelaide, said the jury for selecting the winners was “particularly impressed with the connection to the theme of invisibility displayed in the five chosen works, and the way each composer came up with a using innovative and creative compositional techniques to engage the listener with the material.Using the subject matter to address their own experiences of invisibility was also applauded, elevating these five submissions in the eyes of the panel.

Luke Altmann will compose a work in three parts for violin, cello and double bass with harmonicas entitled Parlando Spectral. The texts of each part will be chosen to illuminate inaudibility being to sound what invisibility is to sight.

Jesse Budel will draw on his background and expertise in acoustic ecology, soundscape composition and ecological sound art to write a work for string quartet exploring the invisibility of South Australia’s endangered species.

Georgina Bowden will compose a quartet for two flutes and two double basses, which will explore the beautiful and complex microstructures linked to the immensity of deep time inspired by ‘Underground’ (microscopic minerals revealing slow geological processes).

Belinda Gehlert will compose a string quartet inspired by a poem generated for her by the Nina Rajics Mirror Ritual exhibition at the MOD. and Mary Oliver’s poem Have you ever tried to enter the long black branches?

Hilary Kleinig will compose a trio for guitar, clarinet and cello entitled Karrawirra Parri / The river flows throughwho considers what it means to “be present in the shadow of absence, silence and invisibility”.

Composer Becky Llewellyn, who was a member of the panel, said: “There is such a wealth of talent represented in these composers. [and significantly] the response to the open call reached a 50/50 split of male and female ID composers. It’s the gold standard.

“We are delighted with the level of interest this project has generated,” said Carey, “and it has highlighted for us the need for continued opportunities for what is a diverse and very talented pool of composers here in Africa. from South.”

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Muti’s Legacy: Respecting Composers, Rejecting Revisionists https://mystic-world.net/mutis-legacy-respecting-composers-rejecting-revisionists/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:11:32 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/mutis-legacy-respecting-composers-rejecting-revisionists/ By RONALD BLUM CHICAGO (AP) — In the twilight of his musical direction of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Riccardo Muti candidly described his legacy and implored musicians to remember his instructions on Giuseppe Verdi’s operas: use 19th-century scores without altered notes. He urged them to reject the concepts of modern directors in search of relevance. […]]]>

By RONALD BLUM

CHICAGO (AP) — In the twilight of his musical direction of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Riccardo Muti candidly described his legacy and implored musicians to remember his instructions on Giuseppe Verdi’s operas: use 19th-century scores without altered notes.

He urged them to reject the concepts of modern directors in search of relevance.

“In 20 to 30 years, when everything falls apart, you might think Muti was right,” the 80-year-old Italian conductor told the orchestra ahead of Wednesday’s rehearsal.

Muti conducts three concerts of ‘Un Ballo in Maschera (A Masked Ball)’ at the Orchestra Hall through Tuesday, the culmination of a Verdi project that included the Requiem, ‘Otello’, ‘Macbeth’, ‘Falstaff’ and “Aïda”. ”

“The problem today is that these operas are often in the hands of directors who, with few exceptions, destroy the opera,” he said in an interview with The Associated. Press after Wednesday’s rehearsal, blaming the podium work of those who don’t study Verdi’s details.

“From the first opera going to ‘Falstaff’ and the Four Sacred Pieces is a whole arc without a break,” Muti said. “In each opera, we find all the elements that will become important for the next opera. And the first Verdi, the famous Verdi of um-pa-pa, um-pa-pa, um-pa-pa, he didn’t want to write um-pa-pa. It has always been played this way by dilettantes or chefs who do not know.

Muti, whose contract in Chicago runs through the 2022-23 season, sees himself as the descendant of solid Italian conductors dating back to Arturo Toscanini and Tulio Serafin. He’s not a fan of most contemporary directors.

“A lot of them – most of them don’t read music. Some are completely deaf,” he said. too. There’s nothing new to transpose opera to today. In the end, when everyone gets tired, people will start thinking – maybe two generations from now – why don’t we try not to see and experience again what this world was like?

He used the Unpublished Critical Edition of Verdi’s Complete Works, a joint project of the University of Chicago Press and Casa Ricordi begun in the 1970s and still decades after its completion. Editor-in-chief Francesco Izzo traveled from Britain to be in the audience,

Muti insists that reading the score is not enough. One must understand the motivation and purpose of each note and abandon additions to the scores resulting from traditional habits. Jay Friedman, the 83-year-old principal trombone, credits Muti’s attention to dynamics.

“Muti is probably the most consistent musical director and performer we’ve had,” said Friedman, who joined the orchestra in 1962 and played under Fritz Reiner, Jean Martinon, Georg Solti, Daniel Barenboim and Bernard Haitink. . “Let’s be honest, great orchestras can often be on what I call autopilot, which is that all the notes are there, very virtuosic. But it takes a conductor with real imagination and a real sense of what’s possible in a big orchestra to turn that autopilot into something truly special.

A standout cast on Thursday included Lebanese soprano Joyce El-Khoury who gave a shimmering performance in her first role as Amelia. Russian Yulia Matochkina displayed prodigious mezzo-soprano as the witch Ulrica, Italian soprano Damiana Mizzi had exuberant coloratura as the Oscar page, and tenor Francesco Meli was a dashing if somewhat waning Riccardo. Muti drew colors, intonations and tensions rarely heard.

Baritone Luca Salsi, a menacing Renato, arrived in Chicago on Sunday for four days of rehearsals after singing the role last month at Milan’s Teatro alla Scala. Muti first conducted “Ballo” at the Maggio Musicale in Florence in 1974 with Richard Tucker, then in an EMI recording in 1975 with Plácido Domingo followed by a 2001 staging at La Scala with Salvatore Licitra.

“He’s the last of the greats,” Salsi said. “Its magic is to explain the simplicity of the score. Sometimes with certain conductors they try to find something strange or different, but Verdi wrote it all. It is enough to be able to explain why.

Muti did not alter the libretto in which a white judge sings a racial slur towards Ulrica, a black fortune teller accused of witchcraft: “dell’immondo sangue de’ negri (she has black blood)”. Muti says Verdi meant the line to emphasize the judge’s intolerance.

“In many theaters in this country and abroad, for the story of political correctness, they change the phrase,” he told the orchestra. “We must not change so that the next generations know the abomination that has been committed for centuries. If you don’t change, you don’t solve the problem.

Loyalty to the original intent causes him to reject switches such as the depiction of Otello in white and Desdemona in black, and Carmen killing Don Jose instead of the other way around, arguing that there is no is nothing in the score or the libretto to support such setbacks.

“We cannot change history, because if we want to change history, we have to change everything, starting with the Greeks, the Phoenicians, the Romans,” he said. “We have to keep the awful things from the past, tell the young people it was wrong.

Muti’s career included tenures with Italy’s Maggio Musicale Fiorentino (1968-80), Philharmonia Orchestra London (1972-82), Philadelphia Orchestra (1980-92), Teatro alla Scala Milan (1986-2005).

By presenting his CSO operas without staging, he tries to focus the audience on the music. And with the CSO, he avoids the opera houses which, according to him, during the post-concert reception, “are full of very bad traditions”.

“Verdi was for years and years interpreted as a sort of parody of verismo, as a bad Puccini,” he said.

More than any other interpretation of Muti, Verdi will be his legacy.

“I wanted to thank the orchestra and the choir for this long journey that we have made on Verdi for all these years,” he said. “I will cherish the memories of this wonderful musical creation with you, the orchestra and the choir, and I think it was a gift from God that I received at the end of my life to make these operas with you and this time with this wonderful group of singers.

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US Orchestras Programming More Diverse and Lively Composers: Report https://mystic-world.net/us-orchestras-programming-more-diverse-and-lively-composers-report/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 03:00:45 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/us-orchestras-programming-more-diverse-and-lively-composers-report/ American orchestras have revamped their lineup after two years of COVID chaos, playing far more music by composers of color, and works by living composers. A new report from the Institute for Composer Diversity, produced in partnership with the League of American Orchestras and based on data from hundreds of orchestras across the United States, […]]]>

American orchestras have revamped their lineup after two years of COVID chaos, playing far more music by composers of color, and works by living composers.

A new report from the Institute for Composer Diversity, produced in partnership with the League of American Orchestras and based on data from hundreds of orchestras across the United States, found that compositions by women and people of color represented almost a quarter (23%) of pieces programmed by orchestras in the 2021-22 season, up from just 5% in 2015. There is a similar percentage of works by living composers, rising from 12% in 2015 to 22% today.

The 2022 Orchestral Repertoire Report by the Institute for Composers’ Diversity.

These figures contrast sharply with the programming of Australian orchestras, which have been criticized in recent years for their conservative and unrepresentative programming. Ian Whitney, a regular limelight donor, found that for 2020 – before COVID forced so many concerts to be canceled – Australian orchestras only had between 1 and 6% of their advertised programs including works by Australian composers, with the exception of the Adelaide Symphony which arrived at 15.9%.

Talk to The New York Times about the report, President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras Simon Woods said that the pandemic, coupled with the rise of the #MeToo and Black Lives Matter social justice movements, has forced orchestras to be more progressive and socially conscious in their programming.

“The pandemic has been kind of a jolt to the patterns that we’ve known for so long,” Woods told The New York Times. “The change that has been talked about for a very long time has suddenly accelerated enormously.”

Simon Woods, President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras.

Simon Woods, President and CEO of the League of American Orchestras. Image © Mathew Imaging.

Other key findings of the report include:

  • Works by female composers and composers of color (living and deceased) increased by 400%, from 4.5% overall in 2015 to 22.5% in 2022;
  • Works by living composers nearly doubled, rising overall from 11.7% to 21.8%;
  • Works by female composers of color increased by 1,425%, from 0.4% in 2015 to 6.1% in 2022;
  • Works by female composers of living color increased by 1,050%, from 0.4% in 2015 to 4.6% in 2022;
  • Changes in diverse programming occurred in all measured orchestra budget groups and in all geographic regions.

Women Composers and Composers of Color with the the most scheduled shows in the 2021-2022 season include Lili Boulanger, Anna Clyne, Samuel Coleridge-Taylor, Duke Ellington, Gabriela Lena Frank, Jessie Montgomery, Florence Price, Joseph Bologna, Chevalier de Saint-Georges and William Grant Still, among others.

This data comes directly from the season announcements and websites of medium and larger budget orchestras.

Undoubtedly, Australian orchestra numbers have been heavily impacted by the COVID pandemic. The past two years have been a time of major change, with new conductors appointed in Sydney, Melbourne and Queensland, new chief executives in Sydney and Queensland, and the Sydney Symphony Orchestra due to move to the Hall of city ​​of Sydney due to renovations to the opera house. House concert hall.

As we eagerly await announcements for the 2023 season in the coming months, we wait to see if Australian orchestras will finally make room for music from First Nations people, women, gender non-conforming people, composers of color and living composers, as requested. by composer Felicity Wilcox in a recent piece for limelight.

Anecdotal evidence from 2022 suggests that significant numbers of subscribers across the country have simply not returned to the concert hall, and so our orchestras now face a major challenge: should they be bold and schedule a interesting new music that has something to say about our current moment? Or do they stay conservative and fall back on what they know and what they think their audience wants to hear?

We’re waiting impatiently.


Read the Institute for Composer Diversity’s 2022 Orchestral Repertoire Report here.

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MU Member Receives PRS Foundation Composers Award https://mystic-world.net/mu-member-receives-prs-foundation-composers-award/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 10:24:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/mu-member-receives-prs-foundation-composers-award/ The Composers Fund supports the creative and professional development of talented composers with a solid track record and at pivotal stages in their careers. Photo credit: Shutterstock. Nigerian-British composer and singer-songwriter Helen Epega, who performs under the stage name The Venus Bushfires, has been awarded the breakthrough Composers Fund award. His pieces are described as […]]]>
The Composers Fund supports the creative and professional development of talented composers with a solid track record and at pivotal stages in their careers. Photo credit: Shutterstock.

Nigerian-British composer and singer-songwriter Helen Epega, who performs under the stage name The Venus Bushfires, has been awarded the breakthrough Composers Fund award. His pieces are described as “new work telling British stories from trending topics on Twitter (UK), from a Nigerian perspective expressed through indigenous, African and Western classical instruments”.

Helen said:

“I am happy to share that I am one of seven recipients of the latest PRS Foundation Composers’ Award. I also run expressive arts workshops, give lectures and talks in the UK and abroad on how I composed the world’s first pidgin (broken English) opera, “Song Queen: At Pidgin Opera”.

“I use music to bring together seemingly disparate groups to exchange ideas in a meaningful way.”

Elizabeth Sills, grants and programs manager at the PRS Foundation, said:

“Congratulations to each of the seven outstanding composers in this round of funding. We are delighted that, through the Composers Fund, we are able to support talented composers at crucial stages in their careers to take the next step in their development.

“Along with our friends at Jerwood Arts, we can’t wait to see how this support for their respective projects impacts each of their careers.”

About the Composers Prize

The Composers Fund supports the creative and professional development of talented composers with a solid track record and at pivotal stages in their careers. Launched by the PRS Foundation in 2016, the fund offers grants of up to £10,000 to support and enable composers to realize projects and ambitions that may not be possible with traditional commissioning models.

Since its launch, the fund has supported projects such as recordings, promotion and performance of existing works, international co-commissions and development, collaboration of performers, residencies, sabbaticals or fees child care and support for projects or promotion.

This cycle is the fourth in partnership with Jerwood Artswhich since 2020 has enabled increased support for composers who meet the criteria of the fund and whose activities take place in the United Kingdom and who have less than 10 years of career.

For more information, including a list of other 2022 winners, visit PRS Foundation website.

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CONCERT PREVIEW: Advocate for underrepresented composers and new music, Chelsea Randall performing at The Foundry on June 25 https://mystic-world.net/concert-preview-advocate-for-underrepresented-composers-and-new-music-chelsea-randall-performing-at-the-foundry-on-june-25/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 21:45:02 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/concert-preview-advocate-for-underrepresented-composers-and-new-music-chelsea-randall-performing-at-the-foundry-on-june-25/ Chelsea Randall will perform at The Foundry on June 25. Photo courtesy of Chelsea Randall. Stockbridge West — The fact that Chelsea Randall began playing the piano at the age of eight, until age nine – “a bit older than most children start” – was the first of several unconventional chords that the New York-based […]]]>

Chelsea Randall will perform at The Foundry on June 25. Photo courtesy of Chelsea Randall.

Stockbridge West — The fact that Chelsea Randall began playing the piano at the age of eight, until age nine – “a bit older than most children start” – was the first of several unconventional chords that the New York-based pianist and educator York has struck during his career. As a dedicated advocate for underrepresented composers and new music, Randall seeks to create new dialogues between the old, the new and the unknown as a performer and collaborator – as evidenced in the program she brings to The foundry Friday, June 25, launch of “American Mavericks,” a performance, commission and research project celebrating new repertoire for solo piano rarely played by black American composers of the 20th and 21st centuries.

“This is a landmark project on black American composers with the ultimate goal that at some point, hopefully soon, these works will not just be spotlighted – they will be presented in dialogue and connection with other great masterpieces that we know and love, and just be part of the great art,” Randall told The Edge. She pointed out that until then we need broadcasters, d artists and educational institutions to do the work of “drawing attention specifically to underserved groups and amplifying[ing] this diversity”, which the great halls and venerable institutions have been slow to achieve.

Part of Randall’s mission when teaching young students is – from the very beginning of study – to place often overlooked works alongside what she calls traditional characteristics of Western classical music. , “just with the Chopin [and] Mozart… so that students see that there is an equal footing between these different musical periods, cultures and traditions. By placing one next to the other, it enriches the whole canon of music.

Chelsea Randall. Courtesy of the artist.

“My own goal as an artist and artistic director is to amplify the work of overlooked, new and historically underrepresented composers – with [an aim] expand the dialogue about what classical music is [and] how it should be presented,” Randall said pointing to artists such as george walker, Regina Harris Baiocchi, Jonathan Bailey Holland, Jules Eastman, Ondine Smith Moore, Daniel Bernard Romanian, Dorothee Rudd Mooreand H. Leslie Adams. Following the launch of the project in Berkshire – marked by a solo recital highlighting the monumental and late masterpieces of composer George Walker, in honor of the centenary of his birth – Randall will take “American Maverickson the road to New York, San Diego, Pasadena and San Francisco.

The scope of Randall’s interests is hardly one-dimensional. While the music seems to take center stage (his grandmother, a classical pianist, lent Randall her piano to start taking lessons), a keen interest in literature awaits behind the scenes.

“I was very interested in literature and poetry and was actually going to pursue a career in publishing, editing and writing,” said Randall – who eventually enrolled in college in majoring in English – hobbies close to her heart. She describes her musical training as non-traditional, attending a conservatory while remaining grounded in a strong writing and publishing practice on the side, which she openly cites as enriching her practice as a musical artist. Meanwhile, “if it weren’t for [my grandmother]I never would have had [music] as part of my life.

A penchant for research proved helpful (if not instrumental) to Randall’s advocacy work. Leader among his goals? “Breaking down barriers between artists and audiences,” she explains, outlining what drew her to The Foundry – a multidisciplinary arts venue in the heart of the Berkshires.

“I was really attracted to Amy [Brentano’s] mission to create a space that showcases highly stimulating, diverse, experimental work with the goal of connecting people through art in an educational way,” said Randall, who prioritizes interaction with his audience. “It’s really important to me to encourage them to come with me on a journey of discovery by making the music I play accessible, giving them avenues of understanding and connecting with those pieces that they don’t necessarily know by offering them context and context,” all in the hopes of leading them to what Randall calls nuggets — information that leads to a rich, informed listening experience.

The “American Mavericks” project is a natural extension of Randall’s mission as an artist – namely, a desire “to draw attention to the fact that the Western canon represents a great deal of influence from different peoples and cultures, and it needs to be continually expanded for the art to move forward.She refers to the music featured in this project as “typically American music in that it just contains an incredible melting pot of influences” that spans the gamut of western classical to spirituals, from pop and folk to jazz and world music.

It’s not a knee-jerk reaction to the seismic events of the past few years, resulting from what Randally calls “the tragic murder of George Floyd.” This is an intentional and deliberate attempt to present this work from a place of understanding research – of really wanting to present art, in all of its multiple and rich forms, to an audience that we suppose, will appreciate the proverbial dots connected.

“All of these composers work with idioms that create this broad dialogue in themselves,” Randal says of one “that deserves to be more actively performed, taught, and studied.”

REMARK: Praised for her sensitive and intuitive playing, pianist Chelsea Randall brings a unique and often interdisciplinary approach to her programming, forging connections across centuries and genres. She is co-founder and artistic director of EXTENSITY, a New York-based concert series featuring cutting-edge programming by emerging and established artists working in a variety of disciplines, including music, fine art and multimedia. EXTENSITY aims to foster connections between musical traditions, artistic practices and eras with a focus on underrepresented and new voices; furthermore, it creates platforms for artists and audiences to interact and make new discoveries through receptions, artist talks, lectures and events. For more information, visit Chelsea Randall’s website.

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