los angeles – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 00:09:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mystic-world.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T190213.216-1-160x160.png los angeles – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ 32 32 How the Composers of ‘Dune’ and ‘Power of the Dog’ Experimented with Soundtracks https://mystic-world.net/how-the-composers-of-dune-and-power-of-the-dog-experimented-with-soundtracks/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 22:41:11 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/how-the-composers-of-dune-and-power-of-the-dog-experimented-with-soundtracks/ Film composers are always looking for new ways to express ideas and convey the character of music. Two of this year’s Original Score nominees have been particularly innovative in finding musical solutions to storytelling challenges. ‘Dune’ demanded a soundscape unlike anything composer Hans Zimmer had ever tackled (including sci-fi projects such as ‘Inception’ and ‘Interstellar,’ […]]]>

Film composers are always looking for new ways to express ideas and convey the character of music. Two of this year’s Original Score nominees have been particularly innovative in finding musical solutions to storytelling challenges.

‘Dune’ demanded a soundscape unlike anything composer Hans Zimmer had ever tackled (including sci-fi projects such as ‘Inception’ and ‘Interstellar,’ which earned him two of his previous 11 Oscar nominations ). But he was one step ahead: he loved Frank Herbert’s novel and had often imagined the sounds of the desert planet Arrakis.

He didn’t want a conventional orchestra, but he didn’t think a purely electronic score would work either. He then experimented with vocal sounds: songs, whispers, cries of singers from Los Angeles, New York and Australia, all representing the Bene Gesserit, the mysterious fraternity whose power governs the universe in Denis Villeneuve’s film.

“I worked pretty hard to try, in an abstract way, to give you a sense of the subtext, the inner dialogue that the characters were having,” Zimmer says. And as he recorded instruments ranging from electric cellos to Armenian duduks, Scottish bagpipes and newly invented musical noisemakers, he manipulated them all electronically for the final score.

For “The Power of the Dog”, English composer Jonny Greenwood wanted to reflect “the film’s tone, look and color”, and turned to the detuned player piano of the time (1920s Montana) , then learned to play a cello like the banjo that Phil (Benedict Cumberbatch) pinches so often throughout the film.

Greenwood wanted to avoid the traditional American high-pitched score that so often accompanies westerns, so he hired two French horns and 10 string players (violas and cellos) to give a more intimate chamber music feel to much of the show. partition. Surprisingly, the one instrument typically associated with Westerns — a guitar — is missing entirely from “Power of the Dog.”

Greenwood says, “There’s a lot of culture in Phil’s character. He is cultivated and it is not difficult to imagine that his musical tastes are very sophisticated. The fun of such a complex and emotionally repressed character is that he allows for complexity in certain music, as well as simpler, softer things for his contrasting sibling.

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Society of Composers and Lyricists Awards 2022: Best Prediction Scores https://mystic-world.net/society-of-composers-and-lyricists-awards-2022-best-prediction-scores/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 07:21:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/society-of-composers-and-lyricists-awards-2022-best-prediction-scores/ Congratulations to our user Green eyed hummingbird for the top score of 80% when predicting the winners of the 2022 Society of Composers and Lyricists awards on Tuesday. He is just ahead of 43 people at 60% and has a good score of 8,560 points using both Super Bets wisely (500 points each). More than […]]]>

Congratulations to our user Green eyed hummingbird for the top score of 80% when predicting the winners of the 2022 Society of Composers and Lyricists awards on Tuesday. He is just ahead of 43 people at 60% and has a good score of 8,560 points using both Super Bets wisely (500 points each).

More than 1,000 people around the world predicted these SCL Music Champions in five categories at the Los Angeles ceremony. Winning films included “Don’t Look Up”, “No Time to Die”, “The Green Knight” and “Encanto”. The big TV winner was “The White Lotus”.

You can see how your score compares to everyone else in our All Competitors Leaderboard, which also includes links to view each entrant’s predictions. To view your own scores, access the User menu in the top right corner of every Gold Derby page when logged into the site. Use the drop-down menu to navigate to ‘View Profile’, then find links to your ‘Reward Issuance Scores’. Gold Derby must assess the eligibility of each potential winner in accordance with our contest rules. If eligible, the first runner-up receives a $100 Amazon gift card.

For our 11 Gold Derby editors who predict, Rob Licuria ranks first with 60% accuracy. We then have a nine-way tie at 40% for Charles Bright, Riley Chow, Marcus Dixon, Joyce Eng, Daniel Montgomery, Matt Noble, Christopher Rosen, Paul Sheehan and myself. Denton Davidson follows at 20%. View editor scores.

In addition to Eng and Rosen, three other experts made predictions. Tariq Khan (Fox TV) and Wilson Morales (BlackFilmantTV) are at 40%. Clayton Davis (Variety) follows at 20%. See expert notes.

TO PREDICT the 2022 Oscar winners

Make your Gold Derby predictions now. Download our free and easy app to Apple/iPhone devices Where Android (Google Play) to compete against legions of other fans as well as our experts and editors for the highest prediction accuracy scores. Check out our latest betting champions. Can you then top our estimated rankings? Always remember to keep your predictions up-to-date as they impact our latest racetrack odds, which are terrifying chefs and Hollywood stars. Don’t miss the fun. Have your say and share your opinions on our famous forums where 5,000 showbiz leaders hide out every day to follow the latest awards rumours. Everyone wants to know: what do you think? Who do you predict and why?

REGISTER for the free Gold Derby newsletter with the latest predictions

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‘No Time to Die,’ ‘Encanto’ Wins Society of Composers & Lyricists Awards https://mystic-world.net/no-time-to-die-encanto-wins-society-of-composers-lyricists-awards/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/no-time-to-die-encanto-wins-society-of-composers-lyricists-awards/ In a possible glimpse of what could bring home the Oscars for music, ‘No Time to Die’ songwriters Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell and ‘Encanto’ songwriter Germaine Franco took home the Society’s awards. of Composers & Lyricists on Tuesday night at the Skirball Center in Los Angeles. Franco’s Colombian-flavored music for “Encanto” won the award […]]]>

In a possible glimpse of what could bring home the Oscars for music, ‘No Time to Die’ songwriters Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell and ‘Encanto’ songwriter Germaine Franco took home the Society’s awards. of Composers & Lyricists on Tuesday night at the Skirball Center in Los Angeles.

Franco’s Colombian-flavored music for “Encanto” won the award for Outstanding Original Score for a Studio Motion Picture, topping scores for “Dune” and “The Power of the Dog,” among others, in the ballot. Daniel Hart’s medieval sounds for “The Green Knight” won Original Score for an Independent Film. “Encanto” is an Oscar nominee, while Hart was shortlisted for the Oscar but didn’t make the final five.

During her acceptance speech, Franco asked all female composers to stand, honoring her colleagues on International Women’s Day.

Billie Eilish’s Bond theme won Outstanding Original Song for a Drama or Documentary, while “Just Look Up” – by Ariana Grande, Nicholas Britell, Kid Cudi and Taura Stinson, of “Don’t Look Up” – won in the Original Song category for a Musical or Comedy.

Eilish and O’Connell sent a video message thanking SCL and noting how proud they were to be recognized by “some of the great composers and lyricists of our time”. “No Time to Die” is favorite to win on March 27, having already won a Grammy and a Golden Globe, and the SCL honor may be an indicator of voter leanings. “Just Look Up” was shortlisted but did not receive an Oscar nomination; Stinson agreed on behalf of his team.

The score for HBO’s “The White Lotus,” by Cristobal Tapia de Veer, won Outstanding Original Score for Television (beating shows such as “Succession” and “Loki”), while the music for “Battlefield 2042” by Hildur Guðnadóttir and Sam Slater, won the award for Outstanding Original Score for Interactive Media. It was Guðnadóttir’s third SCL victory.

A new award for “emerging talent,” named after legendary composer David Raksin (“Laura”), has been presented to Stephanie Economou, who recently composed the music for Netflix’s “Jupiter’s Legacy.”

Host Aloe Blacc kicked off the evening with a snark directed at the Academy’s controversial decision to award the Oscar for original score in pre-recorded and edited form: “Welcome to such a brave, audacious, we actually honor composers live during the event and not on pre-recorded nonsense.

SCL President Ashley Irwin slammed the Academy’s decision as part of a “disappointing trend among decision-makers around the world…. We won’t sit idly by while our art form is put on hold.” aside as some sort of disposable commodity. He cited SCL’s initiatives including “fighting for copyright reform, fair streaming royalties, proper credits and yes, even the return of the ‘best score’ original “to the main event of the Oscars”.

The annual Spirit of Collaboration Award, presented to a team of composers and filmmakers, was presented to Carter Burwell and her longtime partners Joel Coen and Ethan Coen. Burwell also took the time to talk about the Academy’s decision. Explaining that he was a New Yorker who traded politeness in favor of frank honesty, he simply said, “Fuck the Academy.”

Burwell composed the music for 17 of their films, including the most recent “The Tragedy of Macbeth” by Joel Coen, with earlier titles such as “Fargo”, “The Big Lebowski” and “No Country for Old Men”. Burwell led a small ensemble of musicians in a suite of Coen Brothers film scores.

Other SCL candidates also spoke to Variety on the Academy’s decision, including Taura Stinson (“Don’t Look Up”), Christophe Beck (“WandaVision”), Jeymes Samuel (“The Harder They Fall”) and Diane Warren (nominated for “Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days” and “(Never Gonna) Tame You” from “The Mustangs: America’s Wild Horses”). without music.

This was SCL’s third annual award, given by the organization that represents professional composers, songwriters and music professionals active in the media and music industry. The evening also featured performances by Grammy-winning Judith Hill and Grammy-nominated singer-songwriters Abigail Barlow and Emily Bear (“The Unofficial Bridgerton Musical”).

Sasha Urban contributed to this story.

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Songwriters will protest outside Spotify’s LA offices: ‘Music creators’ livelihoods are at stake’ https://mystic-world.net/songwriters-will-protest-outside-spotifys-la-offices-music-creators-livelihoods-are-at-stake/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 16:05:53 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/songwriters-will-protest-outside-spotifys-la-offices-music-creators-livelihoods-are-at-stake/ Songwriters’ advocacy group The 100 Percenters is planning a peaceful protest in Los Angeles on Monday in support of better royalty rates for music creators from Spotify and other streaming platforms. The songwriter’s band explains why they’re hosting the Spotify protest: “Songwriters are currently paid less than a penny per stream. This should be illegal. […]]]>

Songwriters’ advocacy group The 100 Percenters is planning a peaceful protest in Los Angeles on Monday in support of better royalty rates for music creators from Spotify and other streaming platforms.

The songwriter’s band explains why they’re hosting the Spotify protest:

“Songwriters are currently paid less than a penny per stream. This should be illegal. The majority of song streaming revenue (billions per year) goes to major labels and artists, while songwriters have to hard to live.

“Spotify is battling a proposed 44% pay rise for songwriters in a Copyright Royalty Board (CRB) lawsuit in April; a ruthless battleground, where the livelihoods of many songwriters music are in play.”

Date: Monday, 02/28 Time: 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. PST

Location: Spotify US 9200 Sunset Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069

The group also uses the event as a fundraiser. You will find more information here.

Bruce Houghton is founder and publisher of Hypebot and MusicThinkTank and acts as principal advisor to Groupsintown who acquired both publications in 2019. He is the founder and president of the Skyline Artist Agency and a teacher for Berklee College of Music.

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Charlotte musicians educate, play works by black composers https://mystic-world.net/charlotte-musicians-educate-play-works-by-black-composers/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/charlotte-musicians-educate-play-works-by-black-composers/ The Charlotte Strings Collective performing at UNC Charlotte in February. The group highlights the work of black composers in their performances. Skyler Parrow-Fort Two summers ago, during the uncertainty of the growing COVID-19 pandemic, combined with escalating social and racial tensions, Malik Johnson did what he knows best: he played the violin. Along with about […]]]>

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The Charlotte Strings Collective performing at UNC Charlotte in February. The group highlights the work of black composers in their performances.

Two summers ago, during the uncertainty of the growing COVID-19 pandemic, combined with escalating social and racial tensions, Malik Johnson did what he knows best: he played the violin.

Along with about 20 other musicians, Johnson, who teaches elementary music education at Cabarrus Charter Academy in Concord, grabbed his bow and stepped into his frame on the virtual stage.

“We were all looking for an outlet,” Johnson said. “Social injustice, riots and Covid – it was all so crazy and uncertain.”

The group, now called the Charlotte Strings Collective, aims to highlight the work of black composers and encourage educators to learn about historical and contemporary pieces by these musicians as well.

The group is made up of student musicians, faculty and alumni of UNC Charlotte, Winthrop University and the Northwest School of the Arts, as well as members of the Charlotte and Union Symphonies, music teachers Charlotte-area public schools and independent musicians.

“I needed a way to focus my energy on something positive,” Johnson said. “I’m not the type of person who would want to riot, but I had to do something. I’m glad that happened.

Malik Johnson.jpeg
Malik Johnson teaches elementary music education at Concord and is a member of the Charlotte Strings Collective. Courtesy of Malik Johnson

Highlight grades of excellence

Mira Frisch is a cello teacher at UNC Charlotte and also a member of the collective.

“We started out as a group of colleagues, friends and students who wanted to support the black community in Charlotte, to affirm that black lives matter,” she said. “We have continued to highlight the excellence of these wonderful black composers in their music.”

In December, the ensemble received $18,000 in funding from the UNC Charlotte College of Arts and Architecture Research Fund, including a faculty research grant and support from the Council for the Arts and science, among other sources. ASC’s $3,000 supports “String Music by Black Composers,” which includes a public performance, video recording, and presentation at a national conference.

According to Frisch, the funding covers travel costs when the band performs at conferences, but also professional fees for each musician.

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Mira Frisch Skyler Parrow-Strong

In the summer of 2020, Johnson and the rest of the band played their first virtual show. They performed “mother and child», a tender movement of William Grant Againfrom the 1943 Suite for Violin and Piano, which the composer later expanded for string orchestra.

Yet a Mississippi-born composer of more than 200 works, was the first black composer to have a symphony performed by a professional orchestra in the United States. He also became the first African-American conductor of a major American symphony orchestra, leading the Los Angeles Philharmonic. in 1936.

“We thought that recording a piece by a black composer, this particular piece would be really appropriate for this moment in time,” said violinist Kari Giles, member of the collective and assistant concertmaster of the Symphony Orchestra of Charlotte.

In October 2021, a small group, including Giles and Johnson, traveled to Rochester, NY, for the College Music Society’s annual national conference. After performing the works of Still and other underrepresented composers, the members spoke about each work and what it meant to them personally to be there.

The string group performs works by artists of color such as Joseph Bologne, Chevalier de Saint-Georges, a French virtuoso violinist born in Guadeloupe, conductor and composer of the classical period; Florence Price, whose Symphony in E minor was the first composition by a black woman to be performed by a large orchestra; and Dorothee Rudd Moore.

Perform at UNC Charlotte

On February 8, the collective performed at Rowe Recital Hall on the Charlotte campus in collaboration with assistant dance teacher Tamara Williams and her company, Moving Spirits.

A contemporary work on the program, “Ode to Breonna”, composed by Timothy Adams, Jr.pays tribute to Breonna Taylor, a black medical worker who was fatally shot by Louisville, Kentucky police officers in March 2020 during a failed raid on her apartment.

Other contemporary composers the ensemble has covered include Atlanta vanessa fanning and Jessie Montgomery, a New York-based composer-in-residence for The Sphinx Organization, which supports young string players of color. The collective also performed a hip-hop duo black violinarrangements for strings.

In March, the group plans to travel to Atlanta for the American String Teachers Association National Conference.

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Violinist Kari Giles, assistant concertmaster of the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra, is also a member of the Charlotte Strings Collective. Chris Lee

Continue to promote diversity

The collective’s concerts are part of the group’s larger initiative to address the lack of diversity in classical music, something that has become increasingly relevant in recent years.

For example, when the Baltimore Symphony reviewed lineup numbers in 2015, composers of color and women composers made up 4.5% of orchestral repertoire in the United States, according to Rob Deemer. He is director of Institute for the Diversity of Composersan organization dedicated to the discovery, study and interpretation of music by composers from underrepresented groups.

In 2019, that number had risen to 12%, and for the current 2021-22 season, it is now at 22%. “I think this bodes well for the diversification of orchestral repertoire in the future,” Deemer said in an email.

Play music by one of their own

As assistant violin teacher at Winthrop, CSO’s Giles teaches at Madison Bush. Bush is a violinist and composer, who joined the collective for the performance “Mother and Child” in 2020.

“As a teacher, you want your students to see themselves, in music and on stage,” Giles said. “I’ve always loved playing, but it’s really special for me to be able to play with my students.”

Madison Bush.jpeg
Madison Bush is a violinist, composer and a senior at Wintrhop College who performs with the Charlotte Strings Collective. Josh Wright

At future concerts, the collective will perform Bush’s composition, “Columns,” a piece that Bush described as “a spinning column of lights that gradually spins faster and faster before fading away.”

“It’s kind of scary,” Bush said. “It reminds me of how difficult it is to get this type of music played, especially if you’re a composer from a certain demographic.

“It can be intimidating. But there is also a level of respect that we all have. I love that he recognizes how difficult it is to be in that position, as a songwriter, as a black person, person of color, woman.

Bush said how much she enjoys working with the string ensemble.

“They’re very, very talented adults and individuals, which is sometimes a little surreal, because I’ve only played with my peers,” she said. “I never felt like an outsider in this group, which is really important.”

Giles welcomes diversity, both in the group and for the selections used.

“There are so many voices that have created and continue to create wonderful music,” Giles said. “Our experience as audience members and players only grows the more voices we are exposed to.”

More art coverage

Want to see more stories like this? Sign up for the free Inside Charlotte Arts newsletter at charlotteobserver.com/newsletters. You can also join our Facebook group, “Inside Charlotte Arts”, at facebook.com/groups/insidecharlottearts.

This story was originally published February 24, 2022 06:00.

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Songwriters to Protest Spotify Royalty Rates with Protest in Los Angeles https://mystic-world.net/songwriters-to-protest-spotify-royalty-rates-with-protest-in-los-angeles/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 20:07:23 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/songwriters-to-protest-spotify-royalty-rates-with-protest-in-los-angeles/ Citing “years of paltry royalty rates,” a group of songwriters announced plans for a protest against Spotify stand in Los Angeles this week. In a statement released to media outlets, the 100 per cent—a group of songwriters founded by grammys-Winning artist Tiffany Red announced details of the February 28 event. “Spotify was built on the […]]]>

Citing “years of paltry royalty rates,” a group of songwriters announced plans for a protest against Spotify stand in Los Angeles this week.

In a statement released to media outlets, the 100 per cent—a group of songwriters founded by grammys-Winning artist Tiffany Red announced details of the February 28 event.

“Spotify was built on the backs of music creators, but we have the smaller slice of the pie,” Red said. “Songwriters and producers deserve to earn a living, but instead DSPs and record labels earn billions while we earn peanuts. Enough is enough; our voices will be heard.

The group said in a press release that a “perfect storm” had formed thanks to the recent confluence of royalty rates and Joe Rogan-centric controversies, as well as the exit from the platform of Neil Young and India Arie, among others. Red’s band points to the Music Modernization Act of 2018, which calls for a pay rise for songwriters. Spotify, the group notes, is “fighting” this increase in an upcoming trial.

The Los Angeles demonstration is scheduled to begin at 12 p.m. local time on February 28, with the final location yet to be determined. Attendees can expect “food and drink” to be provided. For more information on the protest, as well as a fundraiser that was still ongoing at the time of this writing, see below.

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Marcus Eley presents But Not Forgotten: Music by African American Composers for Clarinet (Virtual) https://mystic-world.net/marcus-eley-presents-but-not-forgotten-music-by-african-american-composers-for-clarinet-virtual/ Sun, 20 Feb 2022 11:27:48 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/marcus-eley-presents-but-not-forgotten-music-by-african-american-composers-for-clarinet-virtual/ The description “One of the things I wanted to do in this recording is to salute the unsung heroes of musical composition by African Americans,” he explains. “And this recording is dedicated to composers I’ve had the pleasure of working with or composers I’ve admired over the years.” –Marcus Eley Throughout his academic and professional […]]]>

The description

“One of the things I wanted to do in this recording is to salute the unsung heroes of musical composition by African Americans,” he explains. “And this recording is dedicated to composers I’ve had the pleasure of working with or composers I’ve admired over the years.” –Marcus Eley

Throughout his academic and professional career, esteemed clarinetist Marcus Eley was an advocate for the music of African-American composers for clarinet. Join us as Eley presents the songs, research and stories behind his album But Not Forgotten: Music by African American Composers for Clarinet. The majority of the pieces in this collection are exhibited as world premieres as it showcases hidden musical gems by clarinet composers spanning a period from 1868 to the present day, from ragtime to downright impressionist. The presentation will end with a must-see live solo performance by Eley!

Marcus Eley graduated from the Indiana University School of Music in clarinet and studied at the Hochschule für Musik und darstellende Kunst in Vienna, Austria. Eley has performed as a soloist with the Berlin Symphony Orchestra (Germany), the Louisville Orchestra, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Edmonton (Canada) Wind Sinfonia and the National Army Military Band of the People’s Republic of China (Beijing). He has also given many recitals in major cities across the United States. During his first New York recital at Weill Recital Hall, The New York Times cited her performance as “…expert, singing and direct”. As a special honor, Eley was chosen to perform in the Dame Myra Hess Memorial Concert Series in Chicago and Los Angeles.

Register for this event

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Canton Symphony Orchestra Breaks Down Barriers to Celebrate Black Composers | Arts & Culture https://mystic-world.net/canton-symphony-orchestra-breaks-down-barriers-to-celebrate-black-composers-arts-culture/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/canton-symphony-orchestra-breaks-down-barriers-to-celebrate-black-composers-arts-culture/ Historically, black composers have too often been excluded from the classical music narrative. But orchestras across the country recognize that has to change. The Canton Symphony Orchestra is among those who have worked to make classical music a more welcoming place for communities hitherto ignored. Ron Ponder, longtime journalist and former president of the Stark […]]]>

Historically, black composers have too often been excluded from the classical music narrative. But orchestras across the country recognize that has to change.

The Canton Symphony Orchestra is among those who have worked to make classical music a more welcoming place for communities hitherto ignored. Ron Ponder, longtime journalist and former president of the Stark County chapter of the NAACP, reached out to Canton Symphony Orchestra conductor Gerhardt Zimmermann to talk about four composers who deserve attention: Rick Robinson, Florence Price, William Grant Still and George Walker.

Zimmermann calls Rick Robinson a close friend. After years of playing bass for various symphonies, Robinson started his own music company, CutTime Productions. CutTime combines classical music with jazz.

“He felt like classical music wasn’t doing enough to reach a lot of people, okay. There was this standoffish attitude about it. So he quit the Detroit Symphony and he’s now known as name of Mr. CutTime,” Zimmermann said.

Robinson has won invitations to arrange, perform, conduct and publish over a hundred symphonic works throughout his career. He started composing in 1999, which provided more opportunities to present his music to a wider audience.

Florence Price was born in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1887. She was a classical composer, pianist, organist and music teacher. She was the first African-American woman to have her music performed by a major symphony orchestra. His music was performed by the Chicago Symphony in 1933.

“She was really unknown when she was growing up,” according to Zimmerman. “She entered a competition. It was the Wannamaker composition competition and she won for her number one symphony in E minor.

Price composed over 300 works, including four symphonies and four concertos. Price’s career took her to Chicago where her first symphony was included in the program of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. She died in 1953.

William Grant Still was born in 1895 in Woodville, Mississippi, but grew up in Little Rock, Arkansas. He composed around 200 works, including five symphonies and four ballets.

Zimmerman describes William Grant Still as “the father of the African-American composer”.

Still was the first African American whose work was performed by a large orchestra. His piece entitled “The Afro American Symphony” was performed by Howard Hanson of the Rochester Philharmonic.

“Believe it, his music was the most popular of any American composer between the end of World War II and around 1950,” Zimmerman said.

He still conducted the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra in 1936. His music was heard in films such as “Pennies from Heaven” with Bing Crosby. He died in 1978.

George Walker was born in 1922 in Washington DC He was a composer, pianist and organist who was the first African-American to win a Pulitzer Prize (1966) for music.

“His music has a little more hot sauce. It’s a little spicier. He wrote a trombone concerto which I still hope to program in the future at the Canton Symphony Orchestra.

Walker composed several works, including five sonatas. His composition “Lyric for Strings” was his most performed orchestral work. He died in 2018.

The Canton Symphony Orchestra will host a conversation with Rick Robinson later this year. You can find more information here.

Our thanks to Ron Ponder for his work on this story.

Copyright 2022 WKSU. To see more, visit WKSU.
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Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center will present COMPOSERS IN FOCUS: Mary Kouyoumdjian https://mystic-world.net/chamber-music-society-of-lincoln-center-will-present-composers-in-focus-mary-kouyoumdjian/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 19:30:03 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/chamber-music-society-of-lincoln-center-will-present-composers-in-focus-mary-kouyoumdjian/ On Wednesday March 30, 2022 at 6:30 p.m., the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society will present Composers On pointa digital event celebrating the Armenian-American composer and documentary filmmaker Marie Kouyoumdjian. After a discussion with the composer, violinist Jesse Millscellist Mihai Marica, bassist Brendan Kane, clarinetist Todd Palm Treeand trumpeter Gareth Flowers will perform 30 minutes […]]]>

On Wednesday March 30, 2022 at 6:30 p.m., the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society will present Composers On pointa digital event celebrating the Armenian-American composer and documentary filmmaker Marie Kouyoumdjian. After a discussion with the composer, violinist Jesse Millscellist Mihai Marica, bassist Brendan Kane, clarinetist Todd Palm Treeand trumpeter Gareth Flowers will perform 30 minutes to open up, shout by Kouyoumdjian with visuals by artist Kevork Mourad. Composers On point gives audiences a rare opportunity to witness intimate conversations between composers and musicians who know each other and, in some cases, have known and worked together for years.

Open Up, Scream (2017) is a portrait of Roma artist, writer, musician and Holocaust survivor Ceija Stojka. Kouyoumdjian says, “What draws me to Stojka’s work are his themes of nostalgia for the past and dealing with the aftermath of unimaginable trauma. As the granddaughter of Armenian Genocide survivors, these themes are familiar to me in my own culture and family history, and they are common themes in other cultures that have experienced and continue to experience mass extermination. strongly believe in the arts as a medium for change, and I hope to continue the conversation about how we empathize with those who experience the unimaginable, and how we can learn from the past to move forward.”

Each movement is inspired by various Stojka paintings – from her paintings that celebrate her free and vibrant Roma life to those that explore the horrific experiences she endured during the Holocaust. Composed for mixed ensemble and electronic track, the music often incorporates elements of folk music into a contemporary musical language. The ensemble members play amplified with pre-recorded samples of themselves – playing in the present while engaging in the past. Inspired by Stojka’s fond memories of her mother, who would calm her with her singing, a distant, intangible voice presents itself throughout the work. The music alternates between the polarities of happiness and tragedy, in an effort to understand Stojka’s unique perspective, and draws on imagery related to family, community, nature, seasons, fear , nakedness and shame. The piece and the movements are titled after Stojka’s own words.

Digital event details

Composers On point: Marie Kouyoumdjian
Wednesday, March 30, 2022 at 6:30 p.m. ET
Available on request from April 6, 2022
Link: www.chambermusicsociety.org/cms-front-row/online-events/online-events/composers-in-focus-mary-kouyoumdjian/
Tickets: Free, but RSVP required.

Program:
Kouyoumdjian – open me up, scream for clarinet, trumpet, violin, cello, bass, audio playback and film
I. I dream of living
ii. We were ashamed
iii. In the shadow of a smoking crematorium
iv. Auschwitz only sleeps

Jesse Millsviolin
Mihai Marica, cello
Brendan Kane, double bass
Todd Palm Treeclarinet
Gareth Flowerstrumpet
Kevork Mourad, visual artist

About Marie Kouyoumdjian

Mary Kouyoumdjian is a composer and documentary filmmaker with projects ranging from concert works to multimedia collaborations and film scores. As a first-generation Armenian-American from a family directly affected by the Lebanese Civil War and the Armenian Genocide, she uses a sonic palette that draws on her heritage, her interest in music as a documentary, and her training in experimental composition to gradually blend the old with the new. A strong believer in freedom of expression and the arts as an amplifier of expression, his compositional work often incorporates recorded testimonials with resilient individuals and field recordings of places to invite empathy by humanizing experiences. complexes around social and political conflicts.

Kouyoumdjian has received commissions for organizations such as the New York Philharmonic, the Kronos Quartet, Carnegie HallMetropolitan Museum of Art, Beth Morrison Projects/OPERA America, Alarm Will Sound, Bang on a Can, International Contemporary Ensemble, Brooklyn Youth Chorus, the American Composers Forum, Roomful of Teeth, WQXR, REDSHIFT, Experiments in Opera, Helen Simoneau Danse, the Nouveau Classical Project, Music of Remembrance, Friction Quartet, Ensemble Oktoplus and the Los Angeles New Music Ensemble, among others. His work has been performed internationally at Carnegie HallLincoln Center, the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the MASS MoCA, the center of the barbican, Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), Millennium Park, Benaroya Hall, Prototype Festival, New York Philharmonic Biennial, Cabrillo Festival, Big Ears Festival, 21C Music Festival and Cal Performances. His residencies include those with EMPAC, Buffalo String Works, Alarm Will Sound/The Mizzou International Composers Festival, Roulette/The Jerome Foundation, Montalvo Arts Center and Exploring the Metropolis. His music has been described as “eloquently scripted” and “emotionally overwhelming” by The New York Times and as “politically fearless” and “the most heartbreaking moments on stage while performing in New York” by the New York Music Daily. . In her work as a composer, orchestrator and music editor for film, she has collaborated on a wide range of motion pictures, including orchestrating the soundtracks for The Place Beyond the Pines (Focus Features) and Demonic (Dimension Films ).

Kouyoumdjian holds an DMA and an MA in composition from Columbia University, where she studied primarily with Zosha Di Castri, Georg Friedrich Haas, Fred Lerdahl and George Lewis; a master’s degree in notation for film and multimedia from New York University; and a BA in Music Composition from the University of California, San Diego, where she studied with Chaya Czernowin, Steven Kazuo Takasugi, Anthony Davis, Steven Schick and Chinary Ung. Dedicated to the defense of new music, Kouyoumdjian is co-founder of the annual new music conference i??New Music Gathering, was the founding executive director of the contemporary music ensemble Hoteli?? Elefant, and served as co-artistic director of Alaska’s new music festival Wild Shore New Music. A passionate educator, Kouyoumdjian is Assistant Professor of Composition at the Boston Conservatory at Berklee and has taught at Columbia University, The New School, Feirstein School of Cinema at Brooklyn College, Mannes Prep, The Very Young Composers of the New York Philharmonic. Kouyoumdjian is a proud member of the American Composers Forum Board of Directors and is published by Schott’s PSNY. Learn more about www.marykouyoumdjian.com.

Photo credit: Desmond White

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The Wallis presents BRIDGE TO EVERYWHERE performing works by LA-based composers https://mystic-world.net/the-wallis-presents-bridge-to-everywhere-performing-works-by-la-based-composers/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 02:32:28 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/the-wallis-presents-bridge-to-everywhere-performing-works-by-la-based-composers/ The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts presents Bridge to Everywhere, considered one of Southland’s most compelling new chamber music ensembles, on Thursday, March 3, 2022, at 7:30 p.m., at the Bram Goldsmith Theatre. The company’s debut program in Wallis, led by Artistic Director Derrick Skye, features 11 cross-cultural contemporary works by seven Los […]]]>

The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts presents Bridge to Everywhere, considered one of Southland’s most compelling new chamber music ensembles, on Thursday, March 3, 2022, at 7:30 p.m., at the Bram Goldsmith Theatre. The company’s debut program in Wallis, led by Artistic Director Derrick Skye, features 11 cross-cultural contemporary works by seven Los Angeles-based composers that reflect the interconnectedness of the world.

The works, composed by Skye and ensemble members Philip Graulty, Yvette Holzwarth, Anna Kouchnerov, Dimitri Mahlis and James Watterman, explore the connections found between various musical traditions, including Hindustani and Carnatic classical music, traditional western music -African, American folk music, Arabic music. , western classical music and jazz. Bridge to Everywhere strives to build bridges between instruments, musical genres, cultures and people. A concert prelude hosted by Brian Lauritzen of Classical KUSC will take place at 6:30 p.m.

At its core, Bridge to Everywhere, founded by Skye in 2015, promotes compassion and empathy through music. The ensemble uses music to bring people together to celebrate their differences and find common ground, embracing musical collaboration to serve as a model for how people from different backgrounds can work together to forge harmonious relationships. . San Francisco Classical Voice proclaims that “inclusion is…at the heart of Bridge.” Bridge to Everywhere received the prestigious blog’s 2020 People’s Choice Award for “Best Bedroom Performance”.

In addition to Skye, the ensemble includes Rachel Iba, concertmaster; Hannah Arista, vocals/percussion; Yvette Holzwarth, voice/violin/viola; Rachel Mellis, flute; Anna Kouchnerov, violin; Philip Graulty, acoustic and electric guitars; Marc Nimoy, acoustic guitars; Dimitris Mahlis, oud; Michael Elliott Rearick, cello; Marc Gutierrez, electric bass; and James Waterman, percussion/vibraphone.

Upcoming performances at the Wallis in March include pianist Shai Wosner (March 5); Rapunzel alone (March 12-19); The Wallis debut of MUSE/IQUE, directed by artistic director and conductor Rachael Worby (March 12 and 13); Sunday Funday (March 13); DIAVOLO (March 18-20); Bedtime Stories (March 24-26); and Hershey Felder Presents live from Florence The Verdi Fiasco (live broadcast from March 27). The world premiere production of The Excavation of Mary Anning, originally scheduled for February, has moved to The Wallis’ 2022/2023 season.

The Wallis is closely monitoring the ever-changing local health and safety environment and is currently addressing known health factors. If plans change and a performance must be postponed or canceled or if venue capacity limitations are instituted, ticket holders will be immediately advised of the options for their purchased tickets in accordance with The Wallis ticketing policies.

The health and safety of patrons, our staff and performers inside and outside our venue is a top priority for The Wallis, which requires all patrons to provide, on entry, proof of full vaccination, including proof of a booster, or a negative PCR test result within 48 hours or a verifiable antigen test within 24 hours of your performance date, along with an ID with government issued photo. Face masks, covering both mouth and nose, are still required at all times in the room. Wallis health and safety protocols are also subject to change at the sole discretion of the venue or in accordance with LA County and City of Beverly Hills regulations. Our current health and safety protocols and updates can also be accessed at TheWallis.org/Safety.

Tickets, $29 to $59, are on sale now. The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts is located in 9390 N. Santa Monica Blvd., Beverly Hills. To purchase tickets and for more information, please call 310-746-4000 or visit LeWallis.org/bridge.

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