Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ Thu, 19 May 2022 00:06:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mystic-world.net/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-02T190213.216-1-160x160.png Composers – Mystic World http://mystic-world.net/ 32 32 Review: The environmental impact of composers Ellen Reid and Gabriela Ortiz, inside and out https://mystic-world.net/review-the-environmental-impact-of-composers-ellen-reid-and-gabriela-ortiz-inside-and-out/ Wed, 18 May 2022 22:13:49 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/review-the-environmental-impact-of-composers-ellen-reid-and-gabriela-ortiz-inside-and-out/ The plan was as follows: a unique Sunday in Los Angeles promised two major environmental-themed premieres by two famous composers who have long and special associations with the city’s two most important orchestras, as well as a walk sound for good environmental measurement. In the afternoon, at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Gustavo Dudamel completed […]]]>

The plan was as follows: a unique Sunday in Los Angeles promised two major environmental-themed premieres by two famous composers who have long and special associations with the city’s two most important orchestras, as well as a walk sound for good environmental measurement.

In the afternoon, at the Walt Disney Concert Hall, Gustavo Dudamel completed his exceptional Los Angeles Philharmonic cycle of Stravinsky’s first ballets paired with Latin American music. This time, Stravinsky’s “Firebird” would be preceded by Gabriela Ortiz’s “Altar de Cuerda”, a new 33-minute violin concerto featuring the debut of 19-year-old Spanish violinist, everyone’s talking about. .

That evening at UCLA, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra was to conclude the first full season of its celebrated Spanish music director, Jaime Martín, with the premiere of Ellen Reid’s “Floodplain.” If you brought a pair of headphones, Ellen Reid’s ongoing UCLA sound walk provided a perfect prelude.

“Floodplain,” commissioned for the end of the 2019-20 season, fell victim to pandemic cancellations, meaning, Reid told the audience, she put off writing the score for two years. By then, his perception of what “a lush and incredibly dangerous floodplain” might look like had “totally changed”. The unpredictability led, she said, to a very different score than originally expected.

This is the environment for you. I don’t know if she made those remarks before the Sunday performance. Upon learning that UCLA had unpredictably dropped its vaccination and mask requirements for Royce Hall, I changed my plan and attended the LACO concert on Saturday night at the Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, where the requirements remained intact.

The university had lifted its warrants just in time to mark the one-year anniversary of LA’s first live concert for an audience since the COVID-19 shutdowns began. On the same day as LACO’s Royce date a year ago, Dudamel and LA performed a special “Welcome Back” concert at the Hollywood Bowl for first responders like those from the vast UCLA Health network that many of us rely on. . The Bowl audience was distant and masked. Infections in Los Angeles were at a low of 200 and falling. On Sunday, at the new mask-optional Royce, and with Los Angeles Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer now urgently recommending the use of indoor masks, infections in Los Angeles were at least 10 times higher and were increasing rapidly.

The warnings came as no surprise to LACO. The orchestra found itself in the position of having to offer refunds to customers who did not want to risk Royce, as well as needing a last minute replacement for Martín, at his home in London with COVID-19 and unable to complete its first full season after all. .

Yet, in an incredibly lucky case of unpredictability, LACO was able to engage excellent new music specialist Stefan Asbury, who quickly mastered Reid’s score. It also kept the original program, which featured two rhapsodic principal performers, violinist Margaret Batjer and cellist Andrew Shulman in Brahms’ Double Concerto and ended with a Beethovenian triumph with the Fifth Symphony.

I ended up trying the UCLA sound walk on Friday, on an unpleasantly hot and moody afternoon. The soundtracks are strange. They can take you out of the environment and into your own personal world, while making you aware of your surroundings in ways you might not otherwise be.

I walked onto the medical school campus, and Reid’s seductive strummed strings made me think what a slap in the face this lax UCLA policy is for its great medical institution. Gongs then guided me to the welcome rest of the campus botanical gardens, where medical students lingered in scrubs.

The soundscape evolves with its own inevitable unpredictability. Passing Royce and absentmindedly cooling towards an electronic drone, I nearly collided with a creepy, albeit cute, robot driving by that said, “I deliver to the Bruins.” The score reached a warm climax, then came to a dramatic halt, just before I reached Ronald Reagan Hospital, where they are presumably preparing for a surge in COVID-19 patients.

“Floodplain,” which is 17 minutes long, comes to you with its own environmental urgency. The floodplains themselves happen to be unpredictable ecosystems, formed by meandering rivers, filling and emptying in their capricious ways. They create nutrient-rich soil and, like so many of our activities on the lands we occupy, are threatened by unconscious environmental and health politics (UCLA has many companies).

How do you convey that in music? In an earlier piece, “Petrichor”, Reid – LACO’s composer-in-residence – evoked that long-awaited scent of earthy dampness that permeates the atmosphere after the first rain after a drought. For this, Reid convincingly invaded the concert hall with shimmering sound.

In “Floodplain”, the orchestra rises and falls, like a river of sound overflowing from its banks and then evaporating. Tremolos are everywhere, in lush strings and stinging winds and quivering percussion. Richly expressive solo passages for violin and cello could be heard like the living creatures on stage – probably not human, though, for they are too engrossed in texture to sound like aliens. Incandescent melodies, or hints thereof, emerge only at the end, alluding to harmonized floodplains in the environment.

At the LA Phil on Sunday, Ortiz also listened to the harmonies of the surroundings, as she has done in her nearly two-decade relationship with the orchestra. It started with Esa-Pekka Salonen premiering his 2002 “Altar de Piedra” (Stone Altar), a vibrant concerto for three percussionists and orchestra. The latest in his “Altar” series, “Altar de Cuerda”, is now his sixth commission from the orchestra. His fifth, “Kauyumari,” dramatically opened LA Phil’s “Homecoming” gala, celebrating the return to Disney after 19 months of the pandemic.

For Ortiz, an “altar” is an environmental construct, a reverence for our place in the world we inhabit. “Cuerda” is the Altar of Strings and was written for Dueñas. The concerto consists of three movements, each of which is an idealized altar. The first is “Morisco Chilango”, which means a Moorish native of Mexico Cityand begins, as Reid does, in a state of shimmering strings, but is interrupted by startlingly crisp percussive attacks and enthralling rhythm action of a city coming to life.

The beautiful central movement with heavy bass, “Canto Abierto” (open song), evokes a mystical atmosphere of the first Mexican churches. A bass drum resounds, deep strings give a musty cushion and timpani glide as if descending to the center of the Earth. Wind instruments are the wind. The shimmering solo violin does the vocals. A final chord in the orchestra sounds electrically charged.

“Maya Deco”, a Mayan decoration of bravery with a dazzling cadence, became a centerpiece for Dueñas. As a matter of principle, I try to keep adolescent musicians out of our coverage, and this especially goes for the more gifted ones, as they deserve the privilege of growing as artists without outside expectations.

It’s impossible here. It is impossible because “Cuerda” was dedicated to Dueñas but even more so because she is already an exceptional musician. Calm and discreet, she possesses this extremely difficult concerto. Its tone is thin but so deliberately focused that it carries easily. You can say he is determined, because when Ortiz asks for plum-rich, vibrant expressiveness, she delivers with flying colors.

If you want to get an idea of ​​Dueñas, who was named BBC’s Next Generation Artist, the UK Radio Service recently broadcast a rendition of her playing the Sibelius Violin Concerto in her Philharmonic Orchestra debut. from Liverpool shortly before flying to Los Angeles, and he is archive for a month.

KUSC is expected to move eventually to air Sunday’s LA Phil performance, which ended with Dudamel fantastically engulfing Disney in the full ballet score “Firebird,” with that mythical little firebird becoming another enchanted force of nature. The masks, meanwhile, remain at Disney, sure to mitigate a ruinous force of nature.

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festival of ideas aims to contextualize the work of composers | News, Sports, Jobs https://mystic-world.net/festival-of-ideas-aims-to-contextualize-the-work-of-composers-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 17 May 2022 04:42:12 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/festival-of-ideas-aims-to-contextualize-the-work-of-composers-news-sports-jobs/ picture by: Alan Olson Wheeling Symphony Orchestra Music Director John Devlin speaks about the life and work of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich Monday at Wheeling Park High School. Although classical music and opera may seem remote from the modern mentality, the Festival of Ideas aims to bring performances to life […]]]>

picture by: Alan Olson

Wheeling Symphony Orchestra Music Director John Devlin speaks about the life and work of Russian composer Dmitri Shostakovich Monday at Wheeling Park High School.

Although classical music and opera may seem remote from the modern mentality, the Festival of Ideas aims to bring performances to life with a modern understanding of the work and the lives of those who write them.

Panelists discussed the lives of composers Dmitri Shostakovich, Florence Price and Richard Wagner during a Monday morning discussion at Wheeling Park High School, where Park and John Marshall High School students were bussed.

Wheeling Symphony Orchestra Music Director John Devlin, Rabbi Joshua Lief of Temple Shalom, YWCA Wheeling Program Director Ron Scott Jr. and Deputy Conductor Antoine Clark spoke about the lives of composers, the discrimination Price was confronted as a black woman in early 20th century America, the persecution of Shostakovich by Josef Stalin’s government, the shadow Wagner’s work would cast on German identity after her eventual association with the Nazis .

According to Bryan Braunlich, Executive Director of the Wheeling Symphony Orchestra, the goal was to intersect the composers’ personal lives and experiences with the social climate of the modern era.

“(It’s about) shedding light on what it means for their lives, in relation to the socio-political events of the time,” Braunlich said.

Price, born in Arkansas in 1887, was a musical prodigy with degrees in organ performance and another in piano pedagogy, whose career struggled due to racism and sexism in her life, although his work has seen a revival in recent years. Scott, who admitted his musical tastes lay more in hip hop and R&B than classical symphonies, told the assembled students that Price’s struggles still resonated with him.

“When you first walk in, when you’re first introduced, you start to categorize how different this all is to you – ‘How could I identify with classical music?’ She’s a woman, she’s black, all those things that make her too different,” he said. who continues to excel.

“Although the things she had to persevere on were… things like the lynching mobs, like being so light-skinned that she could pass for another race, those are things that I personally cannot relate to. . But I can relate to things like not being believed by people who are supposed to like you, having peers who question or judge the things you’re passionate about, having someone look you in the face and tell you you can’t. doing something your heart is bound to do – these are the things that allow you to relate to this music far more than just having a piano played for you.

Lief took the opposite approach, urging students to look around the room and recognize the differences between people who nevertheless come together to participate in a unified society, unlike the homogeneous society sought by the Nazis, using the music of Wagner as an ideal. Lief went further, contrasting the “impossible genius” of Wagner’s work as a composer against the impossible society his work was used to propel, and invites listeners to confront the beauty of Wagner’s music with the grotesque of his ideals.

“These worldviews should make us feel uncomfortable living today, it should make us feel disconnected. It should cause us problems with Wagner,” Lief said. “If we want to enjoy the beauty of the music itself, we have to wrestle with the person who wrote it and the worldview he was trying to present. If it gives us the opportunity to talk about it and think about it, then it’s worth it.

Devlin, who is a scholar of Shostakovich, described the composer’s work as a rebellion against the demand for “patriotic” music, derived from Russian folk songs and music with militaristic themes. Faced with increasingly strict restrictions on what constitutes acceptable music, Shostakovich turned to opera, which allowed greater freedom of expression of his opinions satirizing the state police department in “The Nose” and “Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk”, which was harshly criticized in state media. in an article sometimes attributed to Stalin, and which was banned in Russia for decades.

“Shostakovich’s 4th Symphony, which is about to be premiered, is being removed from the stands by the musicians as they rehearse it to give it its first life,” Devlin said. “Instead, because he knew it was dangerous to create the 4th Symphony as it was then, he wrote the 5th Symphony, which is the piece we will perform on Friday.

“The 5th Symphony, Shostakovich knows, is a moment of life or death for him as a person and for his artistic career. He titled this symphony “A Soviet artist’s response to fair criticism”. … He does this to make sure Stalin authorizes the premiere, and the play is incredibly powerful. The first movement, of the four, is a poignant image of Soviet artistic life at the time.

The Music as History from East to West event will be presented Friday at 7:30 p.m. at the Capitol Theater. The event is free for students who attended the panel, with a discount for accompanying adults. The symphony orchestra will perform Price’s Concert Overture no. 2, Wagner’s overture Der Fliegende Höllander (Flying Dutchman) and Symphony no. 5.

– This is an alternate quote that might go under Lief’s bit. I wasn’t sure what I liked best, so your calling. —

“The question for us who live today is that Wagner’s music is incredibly beautiful – which it is, musically – but the person who wrote it and the themes it espouses are impossible because this society does not doesn’t exist,” Lief said. “He writes about the German myth brought to life on stage, a perfect world where everything is as it should be.

“But that’s not the reality. The real world is diverse, the real world is confusing, the real world is chaotic, and so Wagner’s music is either a tonic that helps us return to a dream vision of what the world would be ‘if only the world were pure and homogeneous, or Wagner’s opportunity for us to reflect on a world that is in fact diverse, and in fact has many variations, and which some argue that diversity makes us richer and stronger in the process.



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New landmark for female composers at Ephrata Cloister https://mystic-world.net/new-landmark-for-female-composers-at-ephrata-cloister/ Tue, 17 May 2022 00:43:53 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/new-landmark-for-female-composers-at-ephrata-cloister/ EPHRATA, Pa. (WHTM) — This was one of Pennsylvania’s earliest experiments with religious freedom. “Ephrata Cloister was an early religious community, established in 1732 by a German immigrant named Conrad Beissel,” Elizabeth Bertheaud explained. She is the administrator of the historic site of the cloister. “The reason it is here is that William Penn established […]]]>

EPHRATA, Pa. (WHTM) — This was one of Pennsylvania’s earliest experiments with religious freedom. “Ephrata Cloister was an early religious community, established in 1732 by a German immigrant named Conrad Beissel,” Elizabeth Bertheaud explained. She is the administrator of the historic site of the cloister.

“The reason it is here is that William Penn established the Pennsylvania Colony as a place where anyone can worship as they please. The Brothers and Sisters were a very small group. At its peak, it’s about 80, that would be about 40 single sisters and 40 single brothers, and about 200 married members of the congregation.

Ephrata Cloister is now part of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. You can find one of the blue and yellow state historic markers at the entrance. Recently the cloister added a second marker, honoring three of the sisters, “Ephrata’s Women Composers”.

“Sister Foben is Christiana Lassle, Sister Hannah is Hannah Lichty, Sister Ketura is Catherine Hagaman,” Bertheaud said. “Our conclusion is that these three women wrote hymns and were the first three women in British North America to write music.

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The women’s compositions were found by a researcher, Dr. Christopher Herbert, in the Ephrata Codexa collection of over 900 pages of Cloister Hymns located at the Library of Congress.

“He identified three songs, which the text of the hymns was obviously written by someone else, but their names appear next to these musical notations,” Berthaud explained.

The sisters would have composed in the Saron, the house of the sisters. Each sister had her room there. They had educational opportunities, turned down many women during this time, and were encouraged to express their artistic side, in things like elegant calligraphy called “Fraturschrifften”, and of course, music.

The women’s compositions would have been played next door, in the church.

“Usually it was a four-part acapella harmony. Sometimes five parts, but usually four,” Berthaud said. And there are no musical instruments. Beissel believed that your voice was your musical instrument.

Conrad Beissel devised his own way of writing hymns and taught it to siblings.

“Christopher Herbert defined it really, really well as a sort of paint-by-numbers musical notation,” Berthaud said. “Yes this happens in the soprano line, then that happens in the other, it’s all pretty scripted. If it’s an A, then it’s a C for tenors, etc. So it’s all pretty scripted, but they’ve managed to put together over 1000 different combinations of this scripted music.

So what would the three sisters have thought of being assigned their own historical landmark?

“They would probably be appalled by the recognition,” Bertheaud said. “Because being the community it was, it was about the community, not the individual. But we were convinced that these women needed to be recognized for their achievements.

To view the Ephrata Codex, Click here.

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Curtis Institute appoints four composers to its faculty https://mystic-world.net/curtis-institute-appoints-four-composers-to-its-faculty/ Mon, 16 May 2022 04:11:23 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/curtis-institute-appoints-four-composers-to-its-faculty/ The Curtis Institute has appointed four composers to its faculty. Composers include Nick DiBerardino, Amy Beth Kirsten, Jonathan Bailey Holland and Steven Mackey. They will begin their respective terms in the 2022-23 school year. The quartet will all work with Curtis students and current faculty member Richard Danielpour to develop composition through classes, seminars and […]]]>

The Curtis Institute has appointed four composers to its faculty.

Composers include Nick DiBerardino, Amy Beth Kirsten, Jonathan Bailey Holland and Steven Mackey. They will begin their respective terms in the 2022-23 school year.

The quartet will all work with Curtis students and current faculty member Richard Danielpour to develop composition through classes, seminars and coaching.

“I am very proud that Jonathan, Amy Beth and Steve, all fantastic composers and educators, are joining us at Curtis,” said DiBerardino, who was named Director of Composition Students and the 2020-21 Curtis Ensemble. in an official press release. . “It is an honor to call them and Dr. Danielpour, my colleagues. Our composition students will greatly benefit from the diversity of musical perspectives they offer, and their vast experience of working with the world’s greatest ensembles will be invaluable not only to our composers, but also to our performance students and our fellows in direction.

DiBerardino is also a Rhodes Scholar whose music has been performed with organizations including Symphony Tacoma, Sandbox Percussion, New College Choir, arx duo, Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival, Music From Angel Fire, and saxophonist Matthew Levy. Residencies include those for the Intimacy of Creativity festival at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Avaloch Farm Music Institute and Hidden Valley. He also founded the first laptop orchestra in England.

Bailey Holland’s work has been performed with organizations such as New World Symphony, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Eighth Blackbird, Awadagin Pratt, Roomful of Teeth, Odyssey Opera, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Network for New Music, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, Emmanuel Music and Plymouth. Musical series, among others.

Kirsten’s work is known for her multimedia theatrical collaborations where she has presented herself as a composer, poet, filmmaker, singer and director.

Finally, Mackey wrote a plethora of music for guitar as well as the short chamber opera “Moon Tea”.

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Bexhill: The International Festival of Composers returns https://mystic-world.net/bexhill-the-international-festival-of-composers-returns/ Sat, 14 May 2022 07:57:07 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/bexhill-the-international-festival-of-composers-returns/ Polo Piatti at the International Festival of Composers 2012 Organizers promise it will be bigger and better than ever. For the first time, all concerts will take place in the same large hall. Register to our daily newsletter SussexWorld Today Spokesperson Julian Norridge said: “There have been more entries than ever: at the last festival […]]]>
Polo Piatti at the International Festival of Composers 2012

Organizers promise it will be bigger and better than ever.

For the first time, all concerts will take place in the same large hall.

Register to our daily newsletter SussexWorld Today

Spokesperson Julian Norridge said: “There have been more entries than ever: at the last festival in 2018, 800 compositions were submitted for consideration.

“This year, that number has grown to 3,650, from 860 composers around the world, from countries as diverse as Kazakhstan, Venezuela and Lebanon. 60 were selected for the performance.

“The idea behind the festival, which was founded by Hastings resident and award-winning British-Argentinian composer Polo Piatti, was to present melodious and accessible music written today by living composers that will appeal to all.

“There will be four concerts over the three busy days. On opening night, Friday, May 20, Ovation will feature mostly new concert music performed by the dynamic 80-piece International Festival Orchestra under the direction of Principal Conductor John Andrews and Associate Conductor Jack Wong. .

“The evening will feature the premiere of Polo Piatti’s Old World Concerto for Cello and Orchestra, performed by virtuoso cellist Tim Posner, with his proud mother, the former principal cellist of the London Mozart Players, playing in the orchestra, and a performance of Anne by one of the UK’s best-known composers, Debbie Wiseman, from her magnificent album Kings and Queens.

“On Saturday morning, May 21, there will be a chamber music concert, Small is Beautiful, performed by international and local soloists, featuring the Hastings Sinfonia Wind Quintet and the Festival’s own ICF Piano Quartet.

“Composers from France and the United States will travel to Bexhill to perform their own compositions.

“On Saturday evening there will be a barnstorming concert of music from film, television and games. There will be well-known pieces from big films such as Slum Dog Millionaire – which Oscar and Grammy Award-winning composer AR Rahman hopes to witness in person – the Harry Potter franchise and Pirates of the Caribbean. And there will be softer music from TV programs such as The Great British Bake Off and new music written for previously unreleased productions.

“Sunday afternoon there will be a family concert called Songs and Dances from Around the World, with specially commissioned symphonic dances reflecting music from different parts of the world, some of them choreographed and performed by the Eastbourne Academy of Dancing.

“There will be international collaborations such as a moving piece by US-based Mexican composer Jose Elizandro choreographed and performed by St Leonards-based Japanese butoh dancer Yumino Seki.

“The concert will conclude with a performance of festival patron Nigel Hess’ extraordinary The Way of Light, featuring young star Eleanor Grant, actor John Watts and St Richard’s Catholic College Choir.

“The joy of the Festival is that composers come from all over the world to hear their music performed. And they want to know how the public reacts.

“So they’re out there in the audience, and they want to talk to as many people as possible.

“It’s a unique, informal and engaging atmosphere. Challenging…and great fun.

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Concert of women composers to support LMTA Music Outreach | neighborhood supplement https://mystic-world.net/concert-of-women-composers-to-support-lmta-music-outreach-neighborhood-supplement/ Sat, 14 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/concert-of-women-composers-to-support-lmta-music-outreach-neighborhood-supplement/ The Lincoln Alumnae & Patroness Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota (SAI) will host an in-person fundraiser for a Female Songwriters Concert to benefit the Lincoln Music Teachers Association’s Music Outreach Program (LMTA-MOP) at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 21 at New Visions Community United Methodist Church, 1610 S. 11th St. The public is invited and voluntary […]]]>

The Lincoln Alumnae & Patroness Chapter of Sigma Alpha Iota (SAI) will host an in-person fundraiser for a Female Songwriters Concert to benefit the Lincoln Music Teachers Association’s Music Outreach Program (LMTA-MOP) at 5 p.m. Saturday, May 21 at New Visions Community United Methodist Church, 1610 S. 11th St.

The public is invited and voluntary donations will be accepted.

The performers will be professional LMTA musicians: Antonio Forgione (classical guitar) and his students Rocio Izaguirre and Gabriel Marks; and Dr. Elizabeth Grunin (cello) accompanied by Dr. Svetlana Yashirin (piano), Matvey Moisseyev (piano), student of Dr. Paul Barnes, and Yve Nelson (piano), student of Jane Sonneland. Paola Izaguirre, (saxophone) student of Jennifer Reeves, will be accompanied by Wanda Mandigo (piano). Paola Izaguirre, piano student of Jo Riecker-Karl, will also perform a piano solo.

Other professional musicians will include Florencia Zuloaga (piano), Jeremy Duck (piano) and Bridget Hill (flute). The program is available on the www.LMTA.info homepage blog.

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The mission of Sigma Alpha Iota International Music Fraternity is to encourage, nurture and support the art of music for female musicians of all ages, races and nationalities. SAI supports and promotes successful and innovative educational music programs for all stages of life, and dedicates financial resources to ensure the continuation of programs to support the goal of fellowship in perpetuity.

The award-winning LMTA Music Outreach Program provides tuition, low-cost instruments and instrument care, sheet music, and performance opportunities for up to 50 needy Lincoln-area students. In May, voluntary donations to the LMTA Music Awareness Program must be made in person at the concert or online at the LMTA page of www.GivetoLincoln.com to qualify for the Lincoln Community Foundation’s $500,000 proportional match and the dollar-for-dollar match by Bryce Williby of Universal Financial Services (UFS). For more information on LMTA-MOP, visit www.LMTA.info and click on Music Outreach Program or email MOP@LMTA.info.

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Women composers of the Belle Époque (Laetitia Grimaldi, Ammiel Bushakevitz) https://mystic-world.net/women-composers-of-the-belle-epoque-laetitia-grimaldi-ammiel-bushakevitz/ Thu, 12 May 2022 14:01:10 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/women-composers-of-the-belle-epoque-laetitia-grimaldi-ammiel-bushakevitz/ Nine female composers from the French Belle Époque are rediscovering their voices with the release of a new album, Ombres, on the prestigious BIS label. The recording marks the debut of soprano Laetitia Grimaldi with her regular accompanist, Israeli-South African pianist Ammiel Bushakevitz. Born in France and raised in London and Portugal, Grimaldi has talent […]]]>

Nine female composers from the French Belle Époque are rediscovering their voices with the release of a new album, Ombres, on the prestigious BIS label. The recording marks the debut of soprano Laetitia Grimaldi with her regular accompanist, Israeli-South African pianist Ammiel Bushakevitz. Born in France and raised in London and Portugal, Grimaldi has talent to spare and made her Carnegie Hall debut in 2015 after graduating from Juilliard. Along the way, she studied with Teresa Berganza and was mentored by Dame Emma Kirkby, Sir Alfred Brendel and, currently, Matthias Goerne.

Among the composers, two are relatively well known – works by Cécile Chaminade now regularly appear on record and Pauline Viardot is no longer known only for her brilliant salon frequented by Chopin, Liszt, Rossini and Berlioz among others. The other seven women – Mélanie Bonis, Armande de Polignac, Juliette Folville, Marguerite Beclard d’Harcourt, Hélène de Faye-Jozin, Gabrielle Ferrari and Augusta Holmès – are less familiar and many of the works on this disc have never been recorded before. .

This collection is a mine of delights. Bonis in particular stands out – she studied alongside Debussy at the Paris Conservatory before her parents took her away. She then became secretary of the Society of Composers. At Viardot The Two Roses is magnificent and shows Grimaldi’s beautiful assured upper register while Chaminade’s homage to the joys of Nice, Nice the beautiful, gets a nice light touch. And listen to the three songs of de Polignac, Love song, king’s garden and Do not look at me. Perfect !

Available on Apple Music

Composer: Chaminade, Viardot, Bonis et al.
Works: Selected songs
Performers: Laetitia GrimaldiAmmiel Bushakevitz
Label: BIS BIS2546 (SACD)

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1st Orlando Sings Festival Honors Pulse Victims and Black Songwriters – Orlando Sentinel https://mystic-world.net/1st-orlando-sings-festival-honors-pulse-victims-and-black-songwriters-orlando-sentinel/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:02:38 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/1st-orlando-sings-festival-honors-pulse-victims-and-black-songwriters-orlando-sentinel/ The first festival of Orlando sings will have both dark and uplifting moments. The new professional choral organization, which presented its first concert in November, will now launch the Orlando Sings Choral Festival. A series of three concerts, starting on May 26, the festival will pay tribute to the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting […]]]>

The first festival of Orlando sings will have both dark and uplifting moments. The new professional choral organization, which presented its first concert in November, will now launch the Orlando Sings Choral Festival.

A series of three concerts, starting on May 26, the festival will pay tribute to the victims of the Pulse nightclub shooting in 2016; honoring both historical and contemporary black composers; and top it all off with a concert at Steinmetz Hall at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

“We hope a festival here will be exciting and reinforce Orlando’s growing reputation as a hub for choral music,” said Artistic and Executive Director Andrew Minear.

The organization includes two ensembles, the Solaria Singers — made up of professional singers based in Central Florida — and the largest 80-member symphony choir, which bolsters the pros with volunteers after “rigorous” auditioning, Minear said.

The Solaria Singers kick off the festival with a performance May 26 at the Pugh Theater at the Dr. Phillips Center in downtown Orlando.

This concert will pay tribute to black composers, many of whom have failed to get their due from the musical establishment.

“We are committed to playing music that represents the diversity of our community,” Minear said. “There is a whole treasure trove of music that has largely gone undiscovered” by mainstream music listeners.

The program will include a selection of spirituals, but will also showcase other forms of musical expression by black composers. Among the historical figures whose music will be heard: R. Nathaniel Dett and Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. Contemporary composers, including Zanaida Robles and André Thomas, will also be featured.

The Solaria Singers will be joined by famed Master Singers from Jones High School in Orlando, led by Andrea Green.

Minear and the student choir hope to build bridges that will create a more diverse arts scene for the future.

“Part of the philosophy of bringing high school singers on stage is to activate those relationships,” he said. “Hopefully some of these singers will become professional adult singers.”

The second concert of the festival will be part of the Pulse Remembrance Week events, and representatives of the One Pulse Foundation will hold a reflection before the start of the concert.

The Orlando Sings Symphonic Chorus will perform Maurice Duruflé’s Requiem on June 9 at First United Methodist Church in Orlando, accompanied by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra and organist Michael Ging.

“It’s one of the most ravishing choral works ever written,” said Minear, explaining that the composer’s use of Gregorian chant makes the piece both contemporary and timeless.

Also on the program, “Tse Go La (On the threshold of this life)” by Andrea Clearfield. It is inspired by the work that Clearfield and ethnomusicologist Katey Blumenthal did in a remote region of the Himalayas in Nepal, bordering Tibet, where they documented and recorded indigenous music.

“Tse Go La ‘takes a journey from birth’ to passing from this life to the next,” Minear said. “Although it’s not a requiem, it’s an appropriate way to reflect on our lives and our humanity.”

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The final concert, June 11 at Steinmetz Hall at the Dr. Phillips Center, will feature Eric Whitacre’s “The Sacred Veil,” accompanied by piano and cello.

“The stunning acoustics of this room will bring such a level of clarity” to the music, Minear said.

The cello, played by David Bjella, represents the veil itself – the bridge between this world and the hereafter.

In ‘The Sacred Veil’, poet/lyricist Charles Anthony Silvestri tells a story of life, love and heartbreak based on the loss of his wife, Julie, to ovarian cancer at the age of 36. years in 2005.

“It’s a powerful story of love and loss and ultimately of comfort and acceptance,” said Minear, whose wife also died of cancer. “This work is deeply personal. I believe everyone in the audience will be moved, a significant healing for anyone who has suffered a loss.

The program will close with Shawn Kirchner’s “Heavenly Home,” three songs of faith and hope that will create “an exciting and uplifting finale,” Minear said.

  • When or: May 26 at the Pugh Theater at the Dr. Phillips Center, 445 S. Magnolia Ave. in Orlando; June 9 at the First United Methodist Church of Orlando, 142 E. Jackson St. in Orlando; June 11 at the Steinmetz Hall of the arts center.
  • Tickets: Tickets start at $39 for the first two performances and $29 for the final show. Customers interested in attending all three concerts can benefit from a discount by first purchasing a ticket for the second concert (with Duruflé’s Requiem). Orlando Sings will then send a discount code which will take 25% off the ticket price for the other two concerts.
  • Information: OrlandoSings.org

Find me on Twitter @matt_on_arts, facebook.com/matthew.j.palm or write to me at mpalm@orlandosentinel.com. Want more theater and arts news and reviews? Go to orlandosentinel.com/arts. For more fun things, follow @fun.things.orlando on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter.

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Nevada County Composers Cooperative Presents Chamber Music Concert https://mystic-world.net/nevada-county-composers-cooperative-presents-chamber-music-concert/ Thu, 12 May 2022 00:15:20 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/nevada-county-composers-cooperative-presents-chamber-music-concert/ The Nevada County Composers Cooperative tempts fate and does musical mischief. Defying superstitions, on Friday the 13th they present a concert of chamber music for strings, piano, marimba and voice. All works are world premieres, never heard before, and most were composed during the pandemic when live performances were halted. The concert will take place […]]]>

The Nevada County Composers Cooperative tempts fate and does musical mischief. Defying superstitions, on Friday the 13th they present a concert of chamber music for strings, piano, marimba and voice. All works are world premieres, never heard before, and most were composed during the pandemic when live performances were halted.

The concert will take place at Ranch Trabucco in the Il Tempio di Musica (Temple of Music), a barn-like building with acoustics that was built especially for the music.

The composers who will present works are Mark Vance, Durwynne Hsieh, Jesse Haennelt, Jake Collins and Alexis Alrich. Some of the tracks reveal what ideas were simmering and brewing in their minds – for example, Jake Collins’ string quartet: ‘Overwhelmed and Powerless’. From Jesse Haennelt’s string quartet: “Blind Spots”. And Durwynn Hsieh’s Piano Sonata: “Useless, station stop and click”.



Musicians include local and regional favorites: Nevada County’s own concert pianist Lynn Schugren; Bay Area fiddler Rick Shinozaki; mezzo-soprano Sarah Saturnino; percussionist Michael Downing; violinist Miriana Stef; violist David Thorpe; and composer Durwynne Hsieh on cello.

The program includes a variety of instrumental combinations, from solo to duo to quartet. Hsieh’s Piano Sonata is a major four-movement work by Lynn Schugren. Vance’s piece is titled “Three Poems” by Antonio Machado, intriguingly accompanied by marimba rather than piano. Marimba player Michael Downing is often heard as a percussionist with local orchestras and is about to embark on a tour of Austria with percussion quartet Orphic. Alrich’s set of three violin duets has a new-age flavor and a pastoral theme. Two short string quartets by young composers Collins and Haennelt complete the program.



The concert will take place on Friday, May 13 at 7:30 p.m. Trabucco Ranch (Linden Lea) is located at 14328 Barr Ranch Road, Nevada City. Tickets available at the door – $30 adult – $5 student.

The Nevada County Composers’ Cooperative presents a concert of chamber music for strings, piano, marimba and voice. Pictured are Mark Vance and Alexis Alrich at the piano.
Photo provided

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Interview with Tena Clark, Tim Heintz (The Waltons: Homecoming composers’) https://mystic-world.net/interview-with-tena-clark-tim-heintz-the-waltons-homecoming-composers/ Wed, 11 May 2022 22:00:09 +0000 https://mystic-world.net/interview-with-tena-clark-tim-heintz-the-waltons-homecoming-composers/ “I feel like it’s something we really need during this time,” says Tena Clark, one of the composers of the TV movie “The Waltons: Homecoming”. The film is a remake of 1971’s “The Homecoming: A Christmas Story,” the TV movie that spawned the CBS drama that ran for nine seasons and won 13 Emmys. Check […]]]>

“I feel like it’s something we really need during this time,” says Tena Clark, one of the composers of the TV movie “The Waltons: Homecoming”. The film is a remake of 1971’s “The Homecoming: A Christmas Story,” the TV movie that spawned the CBS drama that ran for nine seasons and won 13 Emmys. Check out our exclusive video interview with Clark and his co-composer Tim Heintz above.

The project came to the composers through their friendship with the film’s executive producers Sam Haskel and Hudson Hickman. “We all have something very strong in common, and that’s that we’re all from Mississippi. So we have this Mississippi connection,” Clark explains. Although the composers were excited about the opportunity – both were fans of the original series – they were initially concerned about the short time frame in which they had to work. However, Heintz argues that the team had to trust their instincts, which they ultimately saw as a help rather than a hindrance. “When you don’t have a lot of time to think too much, you just follow your instincts and it’s very instinctive,” he explains. “Fortunately, everyone responded positively to it.”

One of the most daunting tasks for the composers was how to reimagine the show’s classic theme song, originally composed by the Oscar and Emmy winner. Jerry Goldsmith. “We never tried to do better than that,” Clark says. “We looked at how to honor that and move forward.” Heintz explains how they wanted to avoid recreating the characteristic trumpet melody of the original theme. “We don’t want to try to copy and do the same thing,” he says. The new film theme begins subtly on the piano. “Then we developed it with strings and it sort of became its own sound. That also helped inform the sound of the film.

The CW recently announced that a second movie, “The Waltons’ Thanksgiving,” will premiere in November of this year, and Clark and Heintz are also returning to score that movie. The two composers look forward to the next chapter of their collaboration, while honoring the themes of the previous film. However, both agree that it’s important for the score to support the story rather than being too overt. “It’s kind of subliminal,” says Heintz. “We’re not hitting you over the head with this.” Clark agrees. “I feel like every time you watch a movie or TV and you’re distracted by something that’s going on with the score or the composer, I don’t feel like you’re doing your work.”

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